Inter eye Messi to rival Ronaldo at Juventus

first_imgREAD: Inter Milan eye ‘move for Lionel Messi to rival Cristiano Ronaldo at Juventus’ as club target ‘huge signing’But now Inter are said to be plotting an audacious swoop for his fierce rival, according to interesting comments made by Pirelli CEO – and Inter fan – Marco Tronchetti Provera.The quotes led to a front page story for Tuttosport on Tuesday as Tronchetti Provera suggested Suning, the club’s owners, want to make a ‘huge signing’.‘I hope that Suning, once Financial Fair Play will allow it, can make a huge signing,’ said the CEO.‘Messi? How can you say no to Messi?’Now back in the Champions League, Inter are building towards a serious assault on titles both domestically and in European competition and Messi would provide a huge boost in belief.With both players approaching the tail end of their careers, there may be a temptation for the Argentine to try his hand outside of Spain.Having lost Neymar to Paris Saint-Germain last summer for a world record deal, Barcelona will have no desires to sell their biggest star and asset and that is the biggest obstacle for the Italian side.-By Daily Mail- 0Shares0000(Visited 4 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Now back in the Champions League, Inter are building towards a serious assault on titles both domestically and in European competition and Messi would provide a huge boost in belief.LONDON, United Kingdom, July 24 – Lionel Messi has emerged as a shock target for Inter Milan as the club want the Argentine ‘to rival Cristiano Ronaldo at Juventus’.Ronaldo ended his nine-year La Liga dual with Messi this summer as he swapped Madrid for Turin in a Sh11.5bn (£88mn) move.last_img read more

Pew Research: Africa is more economically optimistic

first_img5 August 2015A Pew Research Center (PRC) report, part of its Global Attitudes and Trends Project, has found that global citizens are largely discontent with current economic conditions and are pessimistic about the financial prospects of the next generation. The degrees of dissatisfaction vary widely according to region, with more discontent in Europe and the Middle East than in the so-called emerging African and Asian regions.The PRC is one of the leading independent global research institutes. Based in the US, it gathers and interprets data on global social issues, public opinion, and demographic trends. The research is sourced from public opinion polling, demographic research, media content analysis and empirical social science research.The results of this most recent global economic satisfaction analysis – conducted between 25 March and 27 May and released on 23 July – were generated from 45 435 in-person and telephone interviews across 40 countries with adults 18 years old and upwards.AfricaThree African countries stand out as having the most hope for the next year: Nigeria, Burkina Faso and Ethiopia. Some 92% of Nigerian respondents see their economy improving over the next 12 months, juxtaposed with a global median of 5% who say their local economies will stay the same or worsen. Burkina Faso and Ethiopia are likewise economically optimistic, with more than 80% of respondents in the nations predicting economic progress.Both Nigeria and Ethiopia rank high in their view of long-term prospects, with 84% saying the next generation will be financially better off than the previous generation.Economic growth in Ethiopia, in particular – according to the International Monetary Fund – has beaten every other sub-Saharan country over the past decade and is projected to exceed an annual rate of 8% over the next two years. With a 20% boost over the next budget in public spending on infrastructure and education, Ethiopia remains on track to improve on its previous performance.South AfricaSouth Africa offers some mixed results that nonetheless make for interesting reading. South Africans regard the current economic condition in the country as “good”, with a particularly high positivity among the 18-29 (65%) and 30-49 (57%) age groups.When asked the sample question: “Over the next 12 months, do you expect the economic situation in (your) country to improve/remain the same/worsen?” respondents measured a 45/29/22 ratio, specifically measuring remarkable above- average scores in the 18-29 (53%) and 30-49 (45%) age groups. Some 47% of South Africans feel hopeful about the economic prospects of the country’s next generation.EuropeCountries in Europe have high dissatisfaction levels with current economic conditions with a median of 70% across six prominent EU countries, including Italy (88%), France (85%) and Spain (81%). Contrasting this, Germans are notably satisfied, with 75% believing their economy is in good shape. Regarding future economic potential in Europe, there is a median of 64% pessimism for the next generation.Middle East and Latin AmericaTwo thirds of countries surveyed in the Middle East are also negative about current and future economic prospects in the region. Similarly, Latin Americans, with a median of 63%, regard their economies as gloomy. Brazil (87%) and Venezuela (83%) have particularly negative views. The region in general, however, is more positive about the future, achieving a median score of above 60% in most South American and Central American countries surveyed.AsiaThe Asia-Pacific region also has a relatively bright view of the future – by nearly two-to-one, with a median of 51% saying the next generation will be economically better off. Vietnam (91%) and China (88%) are mostly hopeful, while Japan scores a low 18% regarding the future.Source: Pew Research Centerlast_img read more

2017 Soybean Planting Cab Cam – Billy Pontius, Fairfield County

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest For the first soybean planting Cab Cam of 2017, brought to you by Fennig Equipment, the Ohio Ag Net’s Ty Higgins found Fairfield County farmer Billy Pontius running on April 25th. In a year where farmers are thinking twice about putting additional costs into inputs and equipment, Pontius made some enhancements to his planter that he thinks will pay off come harvest time. He tells Ty all about those upgrades.last_img

Crackdown in Tunisia: This Week in Online Tyranny

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Related Posts curt hopkins A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#TWiOT#web Tunisian Protests Result in Massive Online Crackdown. On December 17th, a young unemployed university graduate, Mohamed Bouazizi, burned himself to death in Sidi Bouzid to protest the economic situation for young people. His death inspired large protests and resulted in the government killing of three protesters so far. With a non-existent media, Tunisians took to the internet to share information on the protests. This resulted in a savage censoring backlash by the Tunisian government. Anonymous, the 4chan-allied, Wikipedia-defending hacker group, subsequently targeted the government’s official site and that of the prime minister, shutting both down. Tunisians are being supported by bloggers around the world, especially in the Arab world. It has been absent, however, in the western media. This should, alas, be no great shock. On the plus side, as DemocracyWorks notes, are the development of the anti-censorship protest song in Tunisia, and protest hip-hop. Saudi Arabia to increase official online repression. Two months after banning Facebook for “religious reasons,” the kingdom, already one of the most repressive places on the planet, is introducing new rules. They include mandatory licensing for all blogs and websites, as well as government-approved editors. Anyone wishing to start an online publication will need “documents testifying to their good behaviour.” It’s almost funny. Almost. Taiwan restricts free expression. One of the trends we predicted, that of democracies aping restrictive countries like China, is in full flower. The latest to join the Shutup Club is Taiwan. In a unique combination of direct government pressure on the media and government-funded advertising, Taiwan’s media is becoming more docile. Freedom House has downgraded the country’s free speech rating. Whether this will inspire a flowering of alternative online expression or muzzle it as well remains to be seen. The GoldenState is Tin. California’s “mellow vibe” has never seemed quite real to anyone who’s spent any time there, and the latest legal moves in the state should dispel the notion of a live-and-let-live state for good. If you are arrested now in California, the police may, pursuant to a California Supreme Court verdict, seize and root through your cell phone without a warrant. Not satisfied with that, the CA legislature has also passed Senate Bill 1411, a law making “epersonation,” masquerading as someone else online, a crime that can send you to jail for a year. Bolivia makes racism-based censorship more palatable. Bolvia’s “anti-racism” law, a cheap screen for censorship against troublesome journalists, has been criticized widely. Disappointingly, Reporters Without Borders has praised the change in language of the new law. Yes, it’s more specific. But the real issue is that speech is being punished, it’s aimed at media organs and it still provides a handy tool for prosecution of uncooperative newspapers, websites and broadcast stations. Racism should be argued down with words and with actions – if a publication is a racist rag, withdraw your patronage, your advertising, your cooperation. But send a government (you know – the guys with the guns?) against it and you’d best start practice throwing your hands up over your head and remaining perfectly still – you’ll find that yourself racist the minute you disagree with the reigning regime. China arrests blogger for being a dirty bird. Given that China arrested a bride on her wedding day for a seven-word retweet, no one should be surprised that the country’s government is as humorless as it is repressive. But as if to make 100% certain that no one is, China has arrested Lin Chenglong, a Guandong resident who wrote a blog called “Eating, Drinking, Whoring and Gambling.” Please note: Lin was not arrested for soliciting a prostitute. Neither prostitutes, pimps nor madams were arrested. You can make a very good case that prostitution is deleterious for all participants (if you want). But that’s not why Lin was arrested. He was arrested for “spreading obscene material on the internet.” He was arrested, in other words, because China’s leadership are a bunch of repressive grannies. last_img read more