Dominant Quins progress to 7s finals after winning group

first_imgHarlequins emerged victorious in Group C of the J.P. Morgan Asset Management Premiership Rugby 7s Series.And 7s skipper David Ward insists securing the title next week at the Rec is well within their grasp if they can carry their momentum through.For tickets to the J.P. Morgan Premiership Rugby Series Final at 7pm on Friday, 9 August at The Rec, Bath visit: bathrugby.com/ticketsSee also:Sloan is confident as Harlequins gear up for 7s 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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

A’s Matt Chapman and Matt Olson win second straight Rawlings Gold Glove Awards

first_imgClick here if you’re unable to view the photo gallery on your mobile device.The A’s had four Gold Glove Award finalists, two are winners.For a second straight year, both third baseman Matt Chapman and first baseman Matt Olson took home Rawlings Gold Glove Awards for the 2019 season, Rawlings Sports announced on Sunday afternoon on ESPN.Shortstop Marcus Semien was a finalist for a second year, but lost out to Cleveland Indians’ Francisco Lindor. Left fielder Robbie Grossman was named a …last_img read more

Are Brains Evolving Bigger, or Fatter?

first_imgTwo papers in Science Sept. 9 claimed that human brains may still be evolving.  According to the authors, two genes related to brain size appear to be under “positive selection” in certain people groups.  One team said their variant occurred the same time as the emergence of art, music, religious practices and sophisticated tool use, though such inferences are subjective (see 11/12/2004 entry).  Michael Balter, commenting on these findings in Science,1 said that although the claims are “potentially dramatic,” caution should be exercised in interpreting the results.  Francis Collins of the Human Genome Project, warned in an AP story printed on LiveScience that “is totally unproven and potentially dangerous territory to get into with such sketchy data” because scientists don’t know when the variants arose or even what the genes do.  The BBC News, however, though admitting that the findings were merely a “tantalising prospect,” titled their version of the story, “‘Proof’ Our Brains Are Evolving.”  New Scientist announced cheerfully, “Human brains enjoy ongoing evolution.”1Michael Balter, “Evolution: Are Human Brains Still Evolving?  Brain Genes Show Signs of Selection,” <Science, Vol 309, Issue 5741, 1662-1663 , 9 September 2005, [DOI: 10.1126/science.309.5741.1662].Evolutionists are hastening to mention that the variants have nothing to do with “intelligence.”  This is apparently to avoid repeating the sins of the early Darwinists, who sought ways to rank humans on an IQ scale that ensured the Brits would remain on top.  But if the “haves” are better musicians than the “have-nots,” this might lead to ranking by MQ, the music quotient.  The world isn’t ready for a new form of Social Darwinism characterized by a battle of the bands and survival of the hittest.  Some of today’s musicians could use a little genetic engineering to reverse the descent of man, but that’s intelligent design, not evolution. (Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Petra to reopen Kimberley mines

first_img17 September 2007London-listed Petra Diamonds and a local empowerment partner have bought the disused Kimberley Underground mines in the Northern Cape province from De Beers for R78.5-million and plan to restore production within the next six to 12 months.Petra Diamonds said in a statement last week that it had formed a joint venture with Sedibeng Mining, its black economic empowerment (BEE) partner, to acquire the mining and associated assets of the Wesselton, Du Toitspan and Bultfontein mines, which together constitute the Kimberley Underground mines.Petra will own 74% and Sedibent 26% of Kimberley Underground mines, which has an expected lifespan of at least 12 years. De Beers halted its underground operations around Kimberley in late 2005.“Alongside Petra’s highly prospective Angolan exploration assets, the acquisition of Kimberley Underground is an important addition to Petra’s substantial base of producing assets in South Africa,” Petra Diamonds chairman Adonis Pouroulis said.“Together, Kimberley Underground, Koffiefontein and Petra’s fissure mines will contribute an annual production in two years’ time of around 400 000 carats.”Petra expects annual production from Kimberley Underground to be in excess of 100 000 carats, bringing in revenue of approximately US$16-million (R115-million) per year.The company said that it would pay De BeersR15-million in cash, while the remainingR63.5-million would be used to assume De Beers’ rehabilitation obligations for Kimberley Underground mines.According to the company, which has operations in South Africa, Botswana, Angola and Sierra Leone, it will run the mines on a care and maintenance basis on behalf of De Beers until it receives all required mining authorisations from South African authorities to mine in its own right.These include the transfer of mining rights and the transfer and delegation of rehabilitation obligations and various liabilities.Petra diamonds already operates two mines in the Free State province and one each in North West province and the Northern Cape.SAinfo reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Only the toughest survive the Berg River canoe marathon

first_imgThe beginning of a gruelling 60 km first stage can seem serene. (Image: Berg River Canoe Marathon) • Anthony Penderis Race Organiser Organisation +27 84 306 0331 [email protected] • South Africa is world’s endurance race capital • Andy Birkett gets his green number, at 23 • SA couple row across the world • Paddling through Northern Cape paradise •The pain is soon forgottenLucille DavieOne of South Africa’s toughest endurance races is the Berg River Canoe Marathon, which starts in mid-July. It’s tough because paddlers sit in their boats for some 60 gruelling kilometres each day of the four-day race, paddling in the middle of winter in a river that is at times blocked by trees and requires paddlers to portage.South Africans appear to have a penchant for pushing themselves to the limit, whether on their bikes, in their canoes, in their running shoes, or in their swimming caps and goggles. And this race certainly pushes paddlers to their limits.The Berg River Marathon was started in 1962 by Willem van Riet, who competed in the 1992 Olympics as a canoeist. “Willem van Riet as a young man took on most of southern Africa’s larger rivers in a canoe and wrote a book on his adventures. He was so inspired after these trips that he thought it would be a good idea to start a marathon on the Berg to get more young people involved in the sport of canoeing,” explains Giel van Deventer, who has completed 44 Berg races.It runs from Paarl to Velddrif in Western Cape, a distance of about 240 kilometres. On day one, the paddlers head off with mist rising over the water, to paddle 62km. Day two is a shorter day, at 45km, while day three takes supreme effort, at a hard 74km. The final day is not easy, at 58km. Throw in the north-westerly wind and a rain storm, and it is the only race in the country in which fewer than half the field step out their boats at the end of the four days.Van Riet’s last Berg race was in 2011. That doesn’t mean he is not paddling – he is, but Van Deventer believes he won’t do another Berg as he is now 75 years old. The competitiors have grown more diverse since the race’s beginning in 1961. (Image: Berg River Canoe Marathon) Race recordThe race record was set in 1990 by Mark Perrow in an incredible time of 13 hours, 34 minutes and 32 seconds. The women’s record is 14 hours, 55 minutes and seven seconds, set in 2008 by Abbey Ulansky. In all, 2 892 paddlers have finished one or more Berg races, with about 170 people finishing the race every year. In its 50th anniversary year in 2011, 317 canoeists paddled across the finishing line at the mouth of the river on day four.A friendly competition has existed for many years between Van Deventer and André Collins, a former race winner. Up until last year’s race they had both done 43 races; then, in 2013 Collins could not compete, so Van Deventer takes the honour of being the canoeist with the most races under his paddle.“Only the toughest will survive,” Van Deventer says. “In the history of South African canoe races it still stands as the only race where less than half the starters could finish.”Canoeing is part of his normal routine, he says – he has completed all the major races in the country numerous times. “I have completed more than 800 canoe races in the past 50 years and I am only 64 so still have many years to come to see if I can end my canoeing career after 1 000 races.”Seasoned paddler Hank McGregor has the record for nine races titles between 2000 and 2012. He did not do the 2013 race as he had international race commitments, but will be back this month, hoping to take his 10th victory. This year, the marathon runs from 16 to 19 July. Last minute route planning for the very first Berg River Canoe race. (Image: Berg River Canoe Marathon)last_img read more

The African Book Trust: Getting South African books into libraries

first_imgThe African Book Trust’s aim is to have more South African books in libraries across the country, making local writing available to more people. Founder Griffin Shea tells us more about the project.Griffin Shea, founder of the African Book Trust, wants more South African books available in libraries. His passion for books is also shown in his store, Bridge Books in Joburg’s city centre. (Image supplied)Priya PitamberThe African Book Trust aims to expand the footprint of South African books. The idea is easy, yet effective. “We have a really simple mission: to give South African books to libraries across the country,” says Griffin Shea, founder of the trust.“That could mean a community library, a school library – any library where the books are available to be read and shared.”Right now, the trust is raising money for the first round of donations. If people want to get involved, there’ll be more information shared on the website, and social media platforms Facebook and Twitter.People want South African booksShea, who also owns the bookstore Bridge Books in Johannesburg’s city centre, is frequently contacted by people wanting to donate books, either to readers, book clubs or libraries.“The African Book Trust sets up a system so that we provide a curated list of books to libraries that want them.”The trust, he hopes, will create a virtuous cycle. “Buying more local books means we’re supporting local writers and publishers, so they can write and print more amazing books.“And we’re expanding the number of readers, by making books as widely available as possible.”More South African books in libraries means there’ll be more opportunities for South African writers to have books published, says Griffin Shea, founder of the African Book Trust. Here’s Veronica Nyathi (background) who manages the Bridge Books website, with numerous South African titles. (Image supplied)Nurturing a culture and love of readingShea describes getting a library card when he was a child as a huge moment: “One of the first milestones in life toward a degree of independence. How incredible is it to have a card that lets you borrow any book you want?”Growing up in a small town in the US, it was through books that he found out about the rest of the world. He says it also developed his love for writing and travel, which eventually became his career: journalism.From chatting to people who pass through his store, Shea has found that South Africans generally love to read, particularly adults in their 20s and 30s.He says it is “unglamorous, logistical issues” that get in the way of promoting a culture of reading. “How do we physically get more books to readers? How do we find out what people want to read? How to we tell people about the great books that are out there? How do we set up a microcredit system so small booksellers can take chances on different kinds of books?”Ongoing and future plansThe African Book Trust, says Shea, has been generously received. “I’m so fortunate to have a stellar board of trustees.”There are already plans to launch a campaign, #5books, to help decide which books to donate next.“We’ll be asking book lovers to choose the five South African books that everyone should be able to read,” he explains. “We’ll have a team go through the suggestions and whittle them down to the five best South African books.”The next step is to raise enough money to be able to get all five books into libraries that want them.“Eventually we’d like to build an endowment, so that we have more predictable finances and can guarantee a certain level of book buying from year to year. But baby steps!”Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

OSU Pumpkin Field night

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Just in time for the upcoming fall harvest, pumpkin growers can learn more about 70 varieties of jack-o’-lanterns, colored pumpkins, pie pumpkins and specialty pumpkin cultivars during a Sept. 15 field night offered by horticultural experts with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.Held from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at The Ohio State University South Centers, 1864 Shyville Road, Piketon, the Pumpkin Field Day will also offer growers the newest research on pumpkin pest and disease control, said Charissa Gardner, program assistant with South Centers.“The workshop is designed for anyone that grows pumpkins currently, or anyone that is interested in starting to grow them,” Gardner said. “In addition to offering information on pumpkin crop management, we’ll also offer growers information on pumpkin disease screening for resistance to powdery mildew, downy mildew, anthracnose and white speck.”Brad Bergefurd, an Ohio State University Extension educator, will lead the field night. In addition to a walking tour of the center’s pumpkin variety evaluations and field research trials, the field night will include information on integrated pest management techniques, Israeli drip irrigation management and a new cooperative pumpkin marketing opportunity for Ohio growers.The field night is free and open to the public and includes refreshments. The deadline to register is Sept. 13. For more information or to register, contact Gardner at 740-289-2071, ext. 132.last_img read more