Construction worker found dead in Lapuz

first_imgInitial police report said Secapure hada cardiac arrest. It was not immediately clear if foul play was ruled out inhis death./PN ILOILO City – A construction worker wasfound dead in Barangay Libertad, Lapuz district. The victim sustained no injuries, makingthe police dismiss the possibility of murder. Secapure’s co-workers discovered him in theirbarracks around 9:20 a.m., a police report showed. Police identified him as 47-year-oldJoey Secapure of Barangay Mapili Grande, Badiangan, Iloilo. last_img read more

New faces on Tipp hurling team to face Cork

first_imgDarren Gleeson is restored to the goalkeeping position for his first match of the campaign for a Premier team already qualified for the quarter-finals. Former Tipp star James Woodlock says Michael Ryan has been using his panel of players well.Tipp FM’s live updates of this Sundays National Hurling League game between Tipp and Cork comes in association with Donal Ryan Motor Group Nenagh, Thurles & Roscrea and Arrabawn Store, Tyone, Nenagh.last_img

More with houses, running water

first_img12 March 2008The proportion of South African households living in informal dwellings decreased from 16.4% in 2001 to 14.4% in 2007, while 74.4% of households now have access to piped water compared to 72.1% in 2001.South Africa’s population increased from approximately 44-million to approximately 48-million people over the same period.This is according to the latest data, released on Tuesday, from Statistics South Africa’s 2007 Community Survey, the biggest survey conducted by Stats SA since the 2001 census, involving research among 250 000 households across the country.The latest release provides data at municipality level on type of housing, type of energy use, and water source among South African households. It also gives estimates of South Africa’s population growth.While the proportion of South African households living in informal dwellings had decreased, and the proportion with access to piped water (within 200 metres of the household) had increased, some municipalities still had a lot of work to do, according to Statistics SA.Three provinces – North West (23.3%), Gauteng (22.7%) and Free State (18.4%) – were above the national average of 14.4% for proportion of households living in informal dwellings, the survey found.The provinces with the lowest percentages of households with access to piped water were Limpopo (56.3%), the Eastern Cape (54.1%) and KwaZulu-Natal (63%).The survey found an increase in the percentage of households using electricity for lighting (from 69.7% to 80%), for cooking (from 51.4% to 66.5%) and for heating (from 49% to 58.8%) between 2001 and 2007.The survey also indicated that South Africa’s population is growing by about 1.5% annually, increasing from approximately 44-million people in 2001 to approximately 48-million in February 2007.South Africa’s smallest province, Gauteng, is still the most populous with about 10-million people, while the Northern Cape still the least populous of the country’s nine provinces, with just over 1-million people.SAinfo reporter and BuaNews Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Only the toughest survive the Berg River canoe marathon

first_imgThe beginning of a gruelling 60 km first stage can seem serene. (Image: Berg River Canoe Marathon) • Anthony Penderis Race Organiser Organisation +27 84 306 0331 [email protected] • South Africa is world’s endurance race capital • Andy Birkett gets his green number, at 23 • SA couple row across the world • Paddling through Northern Cape paradise •The pain is soon forgottenLucille DavieOne of South Africa’s toughest endurance races is the Berg River Canoe Marathon, which starts in mid-July. It’s tough because paddlers sit in their boats for some 60 gruelling kilometres each day of the four-day race, paddling in the middle of winter in a river that is at times blocked by trees and requires paddlers to portage.South Africans appear to have a penchant for pushing themselves to the limit, whether on their bikes, in their canoes, in their running shoes, or in their swimming caps and goggles. And this race certainly pushes paddlers to their limits.The Berg River Marathon was started in 1962 by Willem van Riet, who competed in the 1992 Olympics as a canoeist. “Willem van Riet as a young man took on most of southern Africa’s larger rivers in a canoe and wrote a book on his adventures. He was so inspired after these trips that he thought it would be a good idea to start a marathon on the Berg to get more young people involved in the sport of canoeing,” explains Giel van Deventer, who has completed 44 Berg races.It runs from Paarl to Velddrif in Western Cape, a distance of about 240 kilometres. On day one, the paddlers head off with mist rising over the water, to paddle 62km. Day two is a shorter day, at 45km, while day three takes supreme effort, at a hard 74km. The final day is not easy, at 58km. Throw in the north-westerly wind and a rain storm, and it is the only race in the country in which fewer than half the field step out their boats at the end of the four days.Van Riet’s last Berg race was in 2011. That doesn’t mean he is not paddling – he is, but Van Deventer believes he won’t do another Berg as he is now 75 years old. The competitiors have grown more diverse since the race’s beginning in 1961. (Image: Berg River Canoe Marathon) Race recordThe race record was set in 1990 by Mark Perrow in an incredible time of 13 hours, 34 minutes and 32 seconds. The women’s record is 14 hours, 55 minutes and seven seconds, set in 2008 by Abbey Ulansky. In all, 2 892 paddlers have finished one or more Berg races, with about 170 people finishing the race every year. In its 50th anniversary year in 2011, 317 canoeists paddled across the finishing line at the mouth of the river on day four.A friendly competition has existed for many years between Van Deventer and André Collins, a former race winner. Up until last year’s race they had both done 43 races; then, in 2013 Collins could not compete, so Van Deventer takes the honour of being the canoeist with the most races under his paddle.“Only the toughest will survive,” Van Deventer says. “In the history of South African canoe races it still stands as the only race where less than half the starters could finish.”Canoeing is part of his normal routine, he says – he has completed all the major races in the country numerous times. “I have completed more than 800 canoe races in the past 50 years and I am only 64 so still have many years to come to see if I can end my canoeing career after 1 000 races.”Seasoned paddler Hank McGregor has the record for nine races titles between 2000 and 2012. He did not do the 2013 race as he had international race commitments, but will be back this month, hoping to take his 10th victory. This year, the marathon runs from 16 to 19 July. Last minute route planning for the very first Berg River Canoe race. (Image: Berg River Canoe Marathon)last_img read more

Best of the Buckeye scholarships awarded

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) awarded 16 Best of the Buckeye scholarships at the Ohio Beef Expo on Saturday, March 17. The Best of the Buckeye program is coordinated by OCA and held in conjunction with the Ohio Beef Expo and Ohio State Fair. The Best of the Buckeye Scholarship Division is sponsored by Ohio Ag Equipment and Ohio Cat.The Best of the Buckeye program awarded $500 scholarships to program participants to offset the cost of purchasing, raising and exhibiting a Best of the Buckeye nominated calf awarded based on show experience and need. These scholarships were awarded to participants of all ages, whether they are looking for a boost to get started or they are a more experienced showman, but could use a little help offsetting the cost of a steer or heifer project.Recipients of the scholarship are as follows: Brandon Barr, Xenia, Ohio; Raymond Beneker, Hamilton, Ohio; Brooklyn Cunningham, Howard, Ohio; Jordan Flax, London, Ohio; Russell Fox, Tiffin, Ohio; Claire French, Wakeman, Ohio; Shala Graham, Frazeysburg, Ohio; Blaine Grant, Hicksville, Ohio; Heath Hamer, Green Springs, Ohio; Emma Lewis, Litchfield, Ohio; Lukas Perry, Woodville, Ohio; Tatumn Poff, Chardon, Ohio; Brock Retcher, Defiance, Ohio; Gracie Stirm, Galion, Ohio; Alexis Watkins, Carey, Ohio; and Connor Yochum, Hillsboro, Ohio.This year’s sponsoring partners of the Best of the Buckeye Program are The Folks Printing and Dickson Cattle Company, heifer division; Jones Show Cattle and R.D. Jones Excavating, steer division; Ohio Ag Equipment and Ohio Cat, scholarship division and Sullivan Supply and Stock Show University, breeder recognition. Thanks to these generous sponsors, $60,000 will be given through premiums at each show, scholarships and awards for both participants and breeders. OCA would like to thank these sponsors for contributing to a successful fifth year of the Best of the Buckeye program.last_img read more

During storm local shelters will accommodate more homeless residents

first_imgDuring storm local shelters will accommodate more homeless residents KUSI Newsroom Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom, Posted: March 21, 2019 March 21, 2019 SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Father Joe’s Villages and Connections Housing Downtown will again accommodate more than 160 additional homeless residents needing shelter tonight due to forecasted rain, according to the San Diego Housing Commission.The commission activates its Inclement Weather Shelter Program when temperatures drop below 50 degrees, the chance of rain is higher than 40 percent or sustained high winds are predicted.The program is funded through a partnership between the commission, the city of San Diego, Father Joe’s and Connections Housing. The commission also activated the shelter last night.Father Joe’s can shelter an additional 134 residents throughout the night while Connections Housing can add up to 30 residents.Check-in at Father Joe’s begins at 4 p.m. and residents are expected to check out by 5 the next morning. Check-in at Connections Housing runs from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. and residents are expected to check out by 7 the following morning.Those at both shelters will have meals provided to them.Residents can dial 211 or visit 211sandiego.org to find out more about the county’s Inclement Weather Shelter Program. last_img read more

Yeast rewired to mate when starving

center_img Fungus found in humans shown to be nimble in mating game More information: Intercalation of a new tier of transcription regulation into an ancient circuit, Lauren N. Booth, et al., Nature 468, 959–963 (16 December 2010) doi:10.1038/nature09560 The researchers, led by Lauren N. Booth of the University of California, San Francisco, carried out a series of experiments on three species of yeast: the baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), dairy yeast (Kluyveromyces lactis) and human pathogen yeast (Candida albicans). All three species have three cell types: the haploids a and α, both of which carry a single set of chromosomes, and the product of their mating, the diploid a/α. They also produce haploid spores which are formed when the diploid divides.The a and α “sexes” mate by fusing together and combining the two sets of chromosomes to form the diploid cell type, which is externally virtually identical to the haploids. In this condition all the mating genes are suppressed and it no longer secretes mating factors, which are secreted constantly in the haploid cells.Each of the cell types has specific genes controlled by specific proteins. In the a cells the genes express a factor “MATa1,” and the equivalent in the α cells is MATα2. In the diploid the factors combine to form a complex a1/α2 and this blocks the expression of the four genes involved in mating and the genes specific to the a and α cell types. The new research has discovered that the dairy yeast has evolved a different form of regulation.In S. cerevisiae diploids the genes specific to the a and α cell types are regulated by the a1/α2 complex, which binds to the DNA near the genes it shuts down. Among the proteins expressed by the genes is an intermediate regulatory protein called RME1. In C. albicans the process is the same but RME1 is not present. In K. lactis RME1 is present and is shut down by the a1/α2 complex, but in this yeast RME1 is the only gene regulated by the complex, and it is RME1 that regulates the expression of the other genes.The differences in regulation of gene expression might have little effect since regulation of the genes in each case depends on the presence of the a1/α2 complex. RME1 is not just regulated by the complex, however, and is also regulated in response to levels of nutrients and is activated in starvation conditions. This means that in all three yeast species the “decision” to mate depends on there being haploids of the opposite type present and secreting the a or α mating factors, but in K. lactis the nutrient levels also have an influence, so that in starvation conditions mating is more likely. Mating is a necessary step in the production of spores, which can ensure the yeast’s survival in hard times.The researchers said a reorganization in a relatively recent ancestor K. lactis produced the indirect suppression of the mating genes by RME1. The overall logic of haploid specific genes active in the a and α cells and off in the diploid is preserved, but the “rewiring” integrated nutritional signals into the mating decision.The paper is published in the journal Nature.last_img read more

Family is all that they want

first_imgWhenever calamity strikes — be it natural or man-made — children are the first ones to suffer. But then again, it doesn’t take a calamity to make children traumatic, a broken family has just the same effect.  Advocating children’s right to family is something Butterflies has been doing for ages now. For years, they have been campaigning against the need to eliminate unnecessary institutionalisation of vulnerable children. The family has been recognised as the natural setting for all children by the proposed National Policy for Children 2012, in spite of such legislations and policies we regularly come across institutions set up under the garb of hostels and educational institutions who offer their services to children from poor or low income groups, depriving them of a family life. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’ This was the focus of the Gerry Pinto Memorial Lecture Series — First Call for Children. This year, the lectures (held at the India International Centre on Wednesday) dealt with the issue of a child’s right to family. The lecture was chaired by Vasanti Rama of FORCES; Rajni Palriwal, Department of Sociology, Delhi University; Bino Thomas, Head of department, Social work, Christ University, Benguluru and Rita Panicker, Director of Butterflies. Palriwal delivered the key note address. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix Panicker opened the lecture and spoke of a child’s right to a family and how the two key institutions — family and school — have undergone a change in the last three decades with poverty pushing children to work, forcing many to even migrate. The relationship between poverty and forced institutionalisation though is not very linear, researches conducted by Butterflies have shown children across socio-cultural backgrounds have considered families to be a safety net and prefer living with families. Thomas validated what Panicker said. He said that parenting is no longer just common sense and it was now becoming more of a science and art. Interactions with children in his pre-clinical practice he was told by the children that they want to be parent friendly and parents told him that they would not want to pass on the wounds of their childhood to their children. Children are found to be carriers of family dysfunction and most often behaviour changes are needed with parenting and not with the children. Lack of time, inability to prioritise, generation and communication gap along with a lot of other practical difficulties are some of the reasons he listed as some issues which eventually leads into problem families. Palriwala spoke of extremely dysfunctional families, families with abject poverty, families with illness, neglect, abusive. The state also does not give necessary support to children in this age group and does not figure in any rights, education or health discourse.last_img read more