What’s in the latest issue of Rugby World?

first_imgUncovered – Conor O’Shea on his journey to HarlequinsTour tale – A holiday story from Brian O’Driscoll A full list of contents for the January 2015 edition of Rugby World Green giants: Simon Zebo scores in Ireland’s win over Australia – we ask if they can win RWC 2015 THE NEW issue of Rugby World takes a look back at the autumn Internationals. We ask whether Ireland can win the 2015 World Cup and explain why Vern Cotter’s youth policy is paying off for Scotland.Plus, we have exclusive interviews with Wales wing Alex Cuthbert, England’s Billy Vunipola and cult hero Nick Cummins. We also go behind the scenes at a European Champions Cup game and look at the issues facing Fijian rugby.On top of all that, there’s a FREE 2015 calendar featuring World Cup stars with the UK print edition. Here’s a list of contents – and find out where to buy your copy here or get our free magazine finder app here. Plus, download the digital edition here.SIDELINESYour ultimate rugby guide to Christmas with gifts, matches and the Big Quiz of the Year. Plus, a look at rugby and NFL, 30 Minutes with Drew Mitchell, Hotshots and more…COLUMNISTS Martin Johnson – The former England captain on the 2015 Rugby World CupNick Easter – The veteran No 8 on Quins’ Big Games at TwickersTommy Bowe – Ireland’s try-scoring wing on an unbeaten autumn seriesSPOTLIGHTSZane Kirchner – The Leinster back talks babies, Bulls and facing Brian O’DriscollKyle Eastmond – Why England’s centre must be allowed to flourishAdam Ashe – Scotland’s No 8 on camps, caps and clashing with All BlacksJake Ball – Why the Wales lock is standing out for more than just his beardFEATURESEngland – No 8 Billy Vunipola on why playing rugby for England means so much to himIreland – Can Joe Schmidt’s team lift the World Cup? It’s time to dream…Wales – Alex Cuthbert is a try-scoring threat but he wants to add more to his game LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Scotland – Vern Cotter’s youth policy is bringing optimism. Plus, we pick a XV of U25sKit-out project – We give training advice to competition winners Parmiter’s SchoolChampions Cup – We go behind the scenes at a European Champions Cup tieNick Cummins – Rugby’s biggest cult hero on Japan and his love of adventureFiji – Mosese Rauluni, Ben Ryan and Nemani Nadolo on the Fiji’s continued strugglesSchools rugby – Stephen Jones finds Radley College’s oldest rugby traditions are faring wellADVICE SECTIONPro insight – All Black Steven Luatua on offloadingFitness – Lift like Springbok Tendai MtawariraPro playbook – Phil Greening on how to score from a lineoutMini rugby – Learn how to play rugby golf and spin passREGULARSRugby focus – A news round-up from clubs, schools and women’s rugby, including an interview with Scotland Women’s Steph JohnstonEssentials – The latest books and products TAGS: Highlight last_img read more

Has the France pack gone soft?

first_imgNo one wants a return to the sometimes mindless brutality of yesteryear but the France pack have to be less, well, nice. And they must learn how to play hard, fast and furious within the laws of the game, and learn fast. Because that’s exactly how the Irish eight will play on Saturday.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. The point is that we attribute France’s demise to the absence of flair but it’s as much to do with the disappearance of forwards who were very good, very fierce and very frightening. We think of the late 1970s and 1980s – the ‘golden age’ of France as a world power – as the time of Aguirre, Blanco, Sella, Charvet and Mesnel, but they only weaved their magic once their forwards had softened up the opposition by fair means or foul.They were helped in this regard by the laissez-faire attitude of rugby officialdom, which rarely dished out lengthy bans for dirty conduct. In fairness, their task wasn’t helped by the primitive television technology of the time.
 The French pack was all the more intimidating for the home nations because in general their forwards were rougher. They were men of the deep south, farmers and blue-collar workers, whereas the English, Scots and Irish led gentler professional lives as accountants, businessmen and schoolteachers.Flag bearers: Do France fans want to see more of an edge from their pack? Photo: Getty ImagesProfessionalism has eroded that distinction and there’s little difference today in the upbringing of international players: school to club academy to senior squad to country. They are elite athletes who have an empathy and respect for one another that crosses borders and dilutes the feelings of nationalism that 40 years ago created a more hostile Test-match atmosphere.Another result of the sport going pro is that it is now a business attracting lucrative sponsorship from some of the world’s top companies. In exchange for their money, these companies expect a wholesome product that reflects rugby’s positive values.The French rugby federation, in particular, have done sterling work in the past decade in eradicating the violence from top-flight rugby, but have they gone too far? Their communiques are peppered with words such as ‘respect’, ‘values’ and ‘hard work’, which are all commendable attributes. But watching the French forwards front up so meekly against Italy last week, one couldn’t help wondering if they weren’t showing their opponents a little too much respect. One of the most pertinent comments on the opening weekend of the Six Nations came from David Flatman. The former England prop turned astute TV pundit tweeted that “France have arguably never been less intimidating up front”.Midi Olympique agreed, asking Guy Noves in Monday’s edition why the France pack “lacked aggression” against Italy. The France coach sidestepped the question, blaming his side’s docility more on a lack of speed than aggression. But, in private, what must Noves think when he compares the 2016 vintage to the pack he played behind when he won the first of his seven caps for France in 1977?Noves was on the wing that day, playing in his home city of Toulouse against the touring All Blacks. The Kiwis, who four months earlier had beaten the British & Irish Lions 3-1 in a Test series, arrived in Europe with a formidable pack that included Graham Mourie, Andy Haden and Frank Oliver.But they were up against a French scrum that contained several players of whom the memory, even today, sends a chill down spines of former opponents. “The scariest set of hombres I have encountered on a rugby pitch,” remembered Fran Cotton, who propped the England and Lions scrum throughout the 1970s.Tough unit: The France pack prepares for a scrum in 1986. Photo: Getty ImagesHooking was Alain Paco, a man so tough the great Wales hooker Bobby Windsor named his boxer dog after him. Alongside Paco in the front row was prop (and French military heavyweight boxing champion) Gerard Cholley, who in the 1977 Five Nations had punched out four of the Scotland pack in a manner likened to a “bus conductor proceeding up the aisle taking fares”. Robert Paparemborde was at tighthead, a judo black-belt and a scrummager of immense strength and technique.The France scrum was locked by a couple of monsters in Jean-François Imbernon and Michel Palmie. Two months after the All Black Test, a French court ordered Palmie to pay £7,000 in compensation to an opponent he’d partially blinded with a punch in a club game in 1975.Noves’s Test debut ended in an 18-13 win for France and nine years later the All Blacks were again beaten on French soil, this time in Nantes, a match Buck Shelford described as “the toughest game I played in”. The Kiwi No 8 recalled that “I was knocked out cold, lost a few teeth and had a few stitches down below”. That was Shelford’s way of explaining that a French boot had ripped open his scrotum, an injury that required some gentle needlework from the team doctor.Tough man: Former France second-row Olivier Merle. Photo: InphoThe French side of the 1980s gave way to another generation of hitmen and headbangers, the likes of Alain Carminati, Olivier Merle and Vincent Moscato, the latter famously sent off in the brutal 1992 Five Nations encounter against England at the Parc des Princes, a bearpit of a stadium infinitely more intimidating than the soulless Stade de France. But try naming a French enforcer in the past decade? They’ve had some hard men and talented players, notably Nicolas Mas, Serge Betsen, Lionel Nallet and Imanol Harinordoquy, but none who persistently and viciously went beyond the line of legitimacy. On the back foot: France are driven back by Italy in their first game of the Six Nations. Photo: Inpho center_img We look at whether France’s forwards are lacking the edge and fear factor of yesteryear LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

England v Fiji: Alex Goode gets the stage his talent deserves

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: FijiHighlight Rear gunner: Alex Goode training this week ahead of his first England start under Eddie Jones (Pic: Getty) The Saracens full-back will offer something different to England at Twickenham this weekend as they look to extend their winning run to 12 matches “He’s very elusive. He buys enough time for Saracens to reset for their next play and get one of the Vunipolas probably carrying into your midfield and off you go again. He’s absolutely intrinsic to the success of Saracens.”Powerhouse: Billy Vunipola has shaken off a knock and will line up in a side showing five changesGoode will be pleased to have the Vunipola brothers for company at Twickenham this weekend, because it may be his only chance to convince Eddie Jones that he warrants being more than a peripheral figure.He has won only one cap under the current England coach, off the bench in Rome, and his aim will be to handle the aerial threats with the same aplomb as Brown whilst displaying the kicking and distribution skills seen so frequently at Allianz Park.At club level he has forged a tremendous understanding with Owen Farrell, with the two able to interchange at will in attack to put runners through holes. “Owen’s been shooting the lights out,” says Goode.Before Farrell, Charlie Hodgson held court and when I ask about the impact the Premiership’s recently retired record scorer had on him, Goode is almost reverential in his reply.“He’s the greatest fly-half who’s played in the Premiership. The way he is, his character, composure, he was brilliant to play with and be around,” begins Goode. “He’s a wizard with the ball. I’ve not seen a guy with hands like that.“The greatest”: Former Saracens team-mate Charlie Hodgson had a huge influence on Goode“I heard a great story from Chris Jack when he came over here (to play for Saracens). He said in his time with the All Blacks they had never changed their defensive system, but when they played England and Charlie played against them, they changed it specifically because of the way he played.“And in my experience of playing against people, Jonny (Wilkinson) was great with Toulon but Charlie played with a Sale team that wasn’t a Premiership-winning team and I’ve never been given the run-around at full-back like that. He had the ball on a string and I didn’t get near it. He was just brilliant.”Goode has learnt from such masters, just as they have learnt from him, and how satisfying it would be to see him give a performance that does him justice against Fiji.Recent meeting: Nemani Nadolo clears during last year’s clash at Twickenham in the World CupHe is one of five changes to the side that beat the Springboks 37-21 last weekend, with Teimana Harrison replacing Saints team-mate Tom Wood in the back row, Wasps’ Elliot Daly shifting to wing to accommodate Bath’s Jonathan Joseph at 13 and Semesa Rokodugini, also of Bath, earning a second cap and joining the huge number of Fijian-born wings playing for a different country this weekend.Fiji have not fared too well at Twickenham, losing 54-12 four years ago and 35-11 at last year’s World Cup, but head coach John McKee has promised that his team will take the field with “fire in their bellies and ice in their minds”. It should be a cracker.England A Goode; S Rokodugini, J Joseph, O Farrell, E Daly; G Ford, B Youngs; M Vunipola, D Hartley (capt), D Cole, J Launchbury, C Lawes, C Robshaw, T Harrison, B Vunipola.Replacements: 16 J George, 17 J Marler, 18 K Sinckler, 19 C Ewels, 20 N Hughes, 21 D Care, 22 B Te’o, 23 H Slade.Fiji M Talebula; B Masilevu, A Tikoirotuma, A Vulivuli, N Nadolo; J Matavesi, S Vularika; C Maafu, S Koto Vuli, M Saulo, A Ratuniyarawa, L Nakarawa, D Waqaniburotu, P Yato, A Qera (capt). Some players never win the haul of caps befitting their talent. John Hall, the irrepressible Bath flanker, accrued only 20 caps across a ten-year Test career and James Simpson-Daniel, Gloucester’s bag of tricks, managed only half that tally in the Noughties.Injury is usually to blame but not in the case of Alex Goode, who this weekend wins only his 21st cap when England host Fiji in the second game of the Old Mutual Wealth series.Since the Saracens full-back made his Test debut on the 2012 tour of South Africa, Mike Brown has made 43 starts to Goode’s 13 and, to be fair to the feisty Harlequin, he has often been outstanding.However, Goode offers something different, with his capacity to act as a second receiver heightened by many years of playing in the fly-half shirt.It’s easy to forget that he played in England’s 2008 U20 Grand Slam team as a ten, partnering Ben Youngs at half-back in the first two games and Joe Simpson in the other three.Fly-half pedigree: Goode at ten for England during the 2008 Junior World Cup in Wales (Pic: Getty)Goode was also a promising footballer in his youth, playing at Ipswich Town’s academy before deciding he could do without the tedious journeys – in the days before a bypass was built – to and from his home in Cambridge.“I’m honest enough to know that I was very good at my age and in my area, but could I have made it as a professional footballer? I don’t know,” says Goode, at 28 three years younger than Brown. “Did I want to make it? I loved playing rugby with my mates all the time.“If football was on in the afternoon (after rugby in the morning) I’d play it, I never said no to it, but they felt that football shouldn’t be second best and for every other kid it was (first choice), their parents and grandparents would come and watch. My mum would throw me out the door with muddy knees and I’d go and play and that was it.“I was very competitive, so I loved winning every challenge, going box to box, but I was willing to go out and practise my goalkicking in the mornings and evenings. Would I have done that with football?”Regular choice: Mike Brown helps lay on a try last Saturday against South Africa (Pic: Getty)A Man Utd fan, Goode ended up playing for a local side in Cambridge after stopping with Ipswich. “I was playing centre-forward and scoring goals and was just relaxed. I knew I wasn’t trying to do it full-time, I was just enjoying playing with my mates.“It was an amazingly different outlook in that sense. I knew at 15, 16 that rugby was something I wanted to do. I knew Eastern Counties, London & South-East, England, that was the kind of route I’d rather go down.”Football’s loss was rugby’s gain and Goode’s career has brought plenty of rewards, notwithstanding his limited opportunities on the national stage.He is now the longest-serving player in Europe’s best club team, having made his first league start for Saracens in Richard Hill’s final match in 2008, and many expected him to feature heavily for England long before he won last season’s Premiership Player of the Year award.BT Sport’s Austin Healey knows a class player when he sees one and spoke glowingly of Goode’s vision and decision-making when covering a Saracens match earlier this season.“He has the ability to reset all their play when receiving kicks,” said the former England back. “He picks off dog-legs really well, more often than not he beats the first defender and if he doesn’t he buys time. Replacements: 16 T Talemaitoga, 17 P Ravai, 18 Leeroy Atalifo, 19 Nemia Soqeta, 20 Naulia Dawai, 21 Eremasi Radrodro, 22 Nikola Matawalu, 23 Kini Murimurivalu.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers click here. Find your local stockist here and you can download the digital edition here.last_img read more

Rugby’s Greatest: Schalk Burger

first_img Collapse He would drive the Springboks to World Cup glory in 2007 as well, though this would be sandwiched between two serious setbacks – a neck injury that required cervical fusion surgery in 2006 and a life-threatening bout of bacterial meningitis in 2013.Coming off the bench in a 38-16 defeat of Wales, Burger ended a two-and-a-half-year Test hiatus. Five months on, he burrowed over to help beat England 31-28 at Twickenham.New Zealand legend Sean Fitzpatrick attributed Burger’s remarkable recovery to his “fighting spirit”. Either side of the touchline, undiluted tenacity has served him well. Expand Major teams: Western Province, StormersCountry: South Africa
Test span: 2003-2015Test caps: 86 (72 starts)Test points: 80 (16T) TAGS: The Greatest Players When Jake White took the reins in 2004 he unleashed the gap-toothed, grinning youngster from the start, stood back and ogled at the effects. South Africa took the Tri-Nations for the first time in six seasons. Hurtling into rucks and runners alike, Burger won IRB Player of the Year aged 21. Four years on from their shock loss to… Rugby’s Greatest: Victor Matfield Rugby’s Greatest: Os du Randt Rugby’s Greatest: Victor Matfield LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features.Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. South Africa’s flanker Schalk Burger Rugby’s Greatest: Os du Randt South African second-row Victor Matfield has done much… South Africa Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Expand South Africa Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Rugby’s Greatest: Schalk BurgerMany northern hemisphere supporters simply cannot forgive Schalk Burger for his scuffle with Lions wing Luke Fitzgerald in the opening minute of the second Test at Loftus Versfeld in 2009.During the fracas – one of many that punctuated a savage series – South Africa’s flanker made contact with the eyes of the Irishman. Touchjudge Bryce Lawrence saw everything, and communicated proceedings to French referee Christophe Berdos. The upshot was only a yellow card.Burger returned to the field with the Lions 10-0 up. His raw intensity aided the Springboks in a gargantuan gain-line battle full of fearful collisions. As the hosts fought back to win 28-25 with Morné Steyn’s last-second kick, he racked up 11 tackles, second only to Juan Smith.Appropriately, the blond bombshell exploded into public consciousness. Graduating from the renowned rugby nurseries of Paarl Gimnasium and Stellenbosch University, Burger was part of the 2002 South Africa U21 side that won the World Championship.The next year he broke into the Western Province team and made three replacement appearances at the World Cup in Australia, scoring a try on senior international debut as Georgia were dispatched 46-19. Introducing the South African loosehead prop, who has made…last_img read more

What Is A Typhoon?

first_img Rugby World Cup Fixtures 2023 England and New Zealand matches called off as Japan braces for Typhoon Hagibis Rugby World Cup Fixtures The 2023 Rugby World… Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Collapse Expand England and New Zealand matches called off as… Typhoon Hagibis has wreaked havoc on the Rugby World Cup, but exactly is a typhoon? Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Rugby World Cup Knockout Stages: Who Is Playing Who?center_img Rugby World Cup Fixtures 2023 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Then, in the South Pacific and Indian Ocean, the generic term tropical cyclone is used.So how do typhoons come about? Well they form only over warm ocean waters near the equator. Warm air over the ocean rises upward which causes low pressure below. Moist air from surrounding areas with higher air pressure moves into this area and that then moves upward as well which creates clouds. This system of clouds and wind spins and grows because the ocean continues to feed it.This storm then continues to spin faster and faster which creates an eye in the middle which is very calm and clear. When the wind speeds reach 74 miles per hour, the storm is officially a typhoon, tropical cyclone and hurricane. Who has made the quarter-finals? Find out how… England and New Zealand matches called off as Japan braces for Typhoon Hagibis Rugby World Cup Knockout Stages: Who Is Playing Who? What Is A Typhoon?The hosting of the final set of group stage matches at the 2019 Rugby World Cup have been disrupted and even cancelled by Typhoon Hagibis, but what exactly is a typhoon?Well according to the National Ocean Service; “A tropical cyclone is a generic term used by meteorologists to describe a rotating, organised system of clouds and thunderstorms that originates over tropical or subtropical waters and has closed, low-level circulation.”So what is the difference between a typhoon and a hurricane? Well nothing really because they are called different things purely on the location they appear.For example in the North Atlantic, central North Pacific, and eastern North Pacific, the term hurricane is used.The same kind of phenomena occurring in the Northwest Pacific is called a typhoon. Expandlast_img read more

A war of words on the eve of Typhoon Hagibis hitting the Rugby World Cup

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Preparing: International Stadium Yokohama gets ready for the typhoon (James Crombie/Inpho) A war of words on the eve of Typhoon Hagibis hitting the Rugby World CupFriday became a day of vocal jostling, as statements burst out of the Scotland, Japan, Italy and World Rugby camps about the issue of cancelled Rugby World Cup games. It all started when Scottish Rugby Union CEO Mark Dodson spoke on BBC Radio 4, voicing his concerns that his side would become “collateral damage for a decision that was taken in haste”.He would speak again, but not before others gave their view. Many chose today to make one final comment before monstrous Typhoon Hagibis silences the chatter.The dangerous weather event is expected to bring record-breaking winds and rain, with the Japan Meteorological Agency expecting winds of over 110mph near its centre and gusts of over 150mph. It is being advised that people stay indoors, stock up on supplies and ensure devices are charged, should they need to urgently contact anyone.So Scotland and Japan are set to spend a day holed up in Yokohama and Tokyo respectively, waiting to find out if their vital Test – that will decide which of the two progresses to the quarter-finals – actually goes ahead on Sunday.Related: What to do in a TyphoonRugby World Cup organisers had already cancelled England versus France and Italy versus New Zealand ahead of the typhoon making landfall on Saturday afternoon. Should there be too much danger, damage, or potential for either, and Japan and Scotland cannot play on Sunday, their fixture will go down as a 0-0 draw. Japan will go through; Scotland go packing.Yesterday, with Italy on their way home, the great Sergio Parisse voiced his view that had the All Blacks needed the points, the tournament organisers would find a way to squeeze a game in for them.It all escalated from there, beginning with Dodson. He said on the radio: “My point is that World Rugby will be listening to what is happening around the world – I think opinion on social media is rising all the time about the injustice of this.“I feel for our Italian friends as well, they had no participation in any of the decisions and they are on their way home already, and my view is that we’re not going to let Scotland be the collateral damage for a decision that was taken in haste.”Keen to play: Japan’s Jamie Joseph (Getty Images)Next up was Japan coach Jamie Joseph, who named his side to play the Scots (should the game be on) but was not happy with any suggestion his charges were pumped for a call-off. He said: “We have played and won three Test matches and that’s put us in the best position in our pool. I’d like to remind everybody it hasn’t been a fluke. It’s been a lot of hard work by a lot of people.”Soon he added: “The key difference here between us and Scotland is that we are driven and supported by the whole country. My team is motivated by achieving something that is great, and not by avoiding an embarrassment.”Like Joseph, Scotland’s Gregor Townsend has the hard job of keeping a Test side certain a game is going ahead, while stuck in a hotel. Both want to play rugby if possible on Sunday. But whilst announcing his own team, Townsend was drawn in.“I did see Jamie’s comments,” he said with a smile. “We know it wouldn’t be an embarrassment to lose to Japan, we know they are an excellent side and we will have to play very well to win.“I had a good laugh about (the comments). You may know coaches use press conference to put messages out and get a response. Sometimes you don’t get one.” With two Saturday games cancelled and Scotland and Japan set to be locked away, the rhetoric has intensifiedcenter_img Both sides say they genuinely believe the game will be on. Away from the mics, there is a sense of sunny optimism about some of the Scots. There were yet more views to come in front of recorders, though.Only the beginning: People in Tokyo on Friday (Getty Images)Next up was Italy boss Conor O’Shea. Talking to The Telegraph, he said: “Sport is sport for a reason. It is unpredictable. We didn’t get the opportunity to take on the All Blacks, the Brazil of rugby, for a chance to go through ourselves. If there should be games cancelled on Sunday and re-arranged, that’s not right. We must have consistency in that regard.”In front of the press later on in the same day, Dodson would not be pulled towards O’Shea’s view, instead saying that he had to do his best for Scotland, because they “believe that we are being timed out in this competition, and being timed out is not a comfortable place to be”.They have spoken to two legal minds, with one solidifying their view that there is wiggle room with any agreement they signed pre-tournament. He also doubled-down on the view that they had triumphed in the court of public opinion. But, he cautioned, they were looking for compromise, co-operation, calm discussion.Dodson gave a suggestion. He feels that although playing on Sunday is the best thing for everyone and there is hope that will happen, holding teams where they are, in Tokyo and Yokohama, for another 24 hours would work if it’s off.Related: A question of integrity at the Rugby World CupThen he added a kicker. “I want to say this. On the record. I’m convinced the World Rugby and the Japanese authority are doing everything they possibly can to get this game on, on (Sunday). But if their best endeavours fail for whatever reason, that’s when we have an issue. Then it becomes out of our control.“But what we want to do today, before the weekend, is give people a maximum amount of time to think about it and to look at the optics of this and to make the sensible change for everyone.”Big point: Japan Meteorological Agency forecast division director Yasushi Kajihara (Getty Images)The biggest sound was yet to come though. World Rugby proved that Dodson was right, they had been listening. And they wanted to be heard too. They released a statement condemning the Scots’ public words.The statement went: “It is disappointing that the Scottish Rugby Union should make such comments at a time when we are doing everything we can to enable all Sunday’s matches to take place as scheduled, and when there is a real and significant threat to public safety owing to what is predicted to be one of the largest and most destructive typhoons to hit Japan since 1958.“Along with the 19 other teams, the Scottish Rugby Union signed the Rugby World Cup 2019 terms of participation, which clearly state in Section 5.3: ‘Where a pool Match cannot be commenced on the day in which it is scheduled, it shall not be postponed to the following day, and shall be considered as cancelled. In such situations, the result shall be declared a draw and Teams will be allocated two Match points each and no score registered.’”The clarification then concluded: “It would be inappropriate to make further comment at a time when we are fully focused on the safety of everyone and this weekend’s matches.”At the moment it feels like people are shouting over the top of each other. Social media is even less coherent at times like this. But Hagibis is coming and it makes its own terrible noise.Keep track of all the news from Japan via our Rugby World Cup home page. Follow Rugby World magazine on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Hotshot: Ulster and Ireland U20 centre Stewart Moore

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Ulster and Ireland U20 centre Stewart MooreDate of birth 8 August 1999 Born Ballymoney Province Ulster Country Ireland Position CentreWhen did you first play rugby? I was about six years old at Ballymoney minis. My dad was a big rugby player and brought me through the minis, but I then quit to play football. I just preferred it and I’d always watched football growing up.At secondary school, Dalriada, I picked up rugby again because my friends were playing. From there I was brought into the Ulster U16 set-up and moved to Ballymena Academy when I was 17 because it was more of a rugby school.Who were your childhood heroes? Cristiano Ronaldo, even though I’m a Spurs fan. Rugby-wise, Quade Cooper.What positions have you played? I started on the wing, then moved to 13, ten and 15, but for the last couple of years I’ve played 12 or 13. I like playing centre, and I’d say my footwork and my decision-making are strengths.What about Ireland honours? This article originally appeared in the November 2019 issue of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Good moment: Stewart Moore celebrates his try against Australia (Inpho) center_img I played U18 Schools and U19. I missed this year’s U20 Six Nations, when Ireland won a Grand Slam, with injury, so my goal was to make the Junior World Cup squad, which I did. It was short and sweet, though. I scored a try against Australia, then a few minutes later dislocated my shoulder, which meant I needed surgery.How do you find dealing with injuries? It’s hard but I’ve learnt to get through it while I’m young. Once you can see you’re making progress, it helps.What are your goals for this season?I hope to play a few games for Malone before Christmas once I’m back from injury. When it comes to the Six Nations period, I’d like to be training with the Ulster seniors and take it from there. Last season I was in and out with the U20s, so this year I’ll focus on Ulster and getting the body right. Hopefully I’ll get a run of games.What do you do outside rugby? I’m studying biology at Belfast Met College – it’s something I enjoyed at school.RW VERDICT: Injuries have disrupted Moore’s progress but the centre’s potential is obvious from his stunning try against Australia at the U20 World Cup, a score that went viral. If he can get fit and stay fit, he should be in the midfield mix at Ulster. This age-grade international is highly rated in Irish rugby circleslast_img read more

Premiership Rugby sets new salary cap regulations

first_imgThere is also more scope to study emails, WhatsApp messages and player tax returns “Tax returns are key in making sure players complete those properly and give us extra enhanced oversight of what is going on in the salary cap.”According to Premiership Rugby, for the 2020-21 salary cap year, the level of the salary cap is £6,400,000 with the following credits and exclusions:Home Grown Player Credits totalling £600,000 (up to £50,000 per player) – designed to incentivise clubs to retain home grown talent;EPS/International Player Credits not overall limit but up to £80,000 per player – to cover player absence during international periods;Injured Player Credits totalling £400,000 – to allow replacement players to cover for long term injuries;Two Excluded Players – their entire salary is excluded from the salary cap;Unlimited education fund for players.For the 2021-21 salary cap year, the level will reduced to £5,000,000 with the same credits, except for the total EPS/International Player Credits which will be capped at £400,000. Cracking down: Premiership Rugby (Getty Images) “The ability to look at player tax returns is a massive piece. We have always understood that as a regulatory body there are certain limitations and people may choose to step outside the sporting regulatory framework with a little less concern than they would if they were stepping outside of the law. Premiership Rugby has brought in stricter measures for breaches of salary cap regulations, following last season’s Saracens scandal. They will also be able to study emails, WhatsApp messages and players’ tax returns.Last term the five-time Premiership champions were handed a 35-point deduction (later increased by a further 70-point deduction) and fined £5.36m for salary cap breaches, ensuring saracens’ relegation. However, it was decided there was no means to strip Sarries of silverware accrued during the disputed period.In its wake, former government minister Lord Paul Myners had produced a report which included 52 recommendations for addressing the competition’s salary cap regulations. All of those recommendations will be adopted for the new Premiership season. The league’s 12 clubs and Saracens have agreed to give cap investigators significant powers – and there is more scope for punishment.These include an entry-level points deduction of 50 points, which could decrease or increase, plus powers to relegate, remove titles or trophies and to reclaim prize money.There will also be more opportunity to review players’ tax returns and interview club officials. Each year the league winners will face an extended audit. Within this, investigators can pore over club officials’ emails, texts and WhatsApp messages and at least 50% of players’ tax returns and bank statements.Relegated: Saracens dropped out of the Premiership (Getty Images)Head of governance and regulation Andrew Rogers said: “We use PWC to come in and undertake that. This process has now been given greater powers. There will be greater scrutiny. They will be able to look at a sample of player tax returns and interview club officials.“Each year the champion club will be given an extended audit. This is a far more forensic audit including reviewing emails of club officials, text messages, WhatsApp messages of club officials and reviewing at least 50 per cent of all players’ tax returns, bank statements, plus any further areas I feel are necessary to look into. That is a real enhancement. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

UNRWA extends funding for six months to Gaza’s Ahli Arab…

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Israel-Palestine, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Anglican Communion, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Middle East Rector Bath, NC Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori learns about the ministry of Ahli Arab Hospital from its director Suhaila Tarazi. Jefferts Schori visited Gaza and the hospital in March 2008. ENS photo/Matthew Davies[Episcopal News Service] The United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) has offered to extend funding support for the Ahli Arab Hospital in Gaza for six months, allowing the hospital to honor its financial obligations and retain its staff until the end of 2012.On June 1, UNRWA announced it would no longer fund the hospital, which provides primary and emergency health care to the almost exclusively Muslim population in Gaza. The decision cut the hospital’s budget by approximately $1 million per year, or nearly half.Bishop Suheil Dawani said in a press release that the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem, which runs the hospital, is “absolutely committed” to keeping the institution open, “as it is the only Christian hospital in the Gaza Strip, … [but] we know that we need to move quickly to help the hospital transition to a different model, so that it is not financially dependent on UNRWA from 2013 and so that donors can have confidence to continue to invest in equipment and programs.”Dawani said that the diocese has engaged a consultancy firm to assist with the development of a new strategic plan for the hospital’s future.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori welcomed the news about UNRWA’s bridging contract. While it doesn’t solve the longer-term problem of funding, she said, it does at least offer some space.“The Episcopal Church is most grateful for UNRWA’s decision to provide six months of transitional support to Al Ahli Hospital,” Jefferts Schori told ENS July 26. “This offers the Diocese of Jerusalem a slim window in which to develop funding for 2013 and beyond. It will be challenging work, but I have abundant hope that partners from around the world will rally to support this essential and transformative ministry of healing.”UNRWA, which functions as a relief agency for Palestinian refugees, earlier this year decided to run a transparent application process for its funding of in-patient services in Gaza. The Ahli Arab Hospital, one of Gaza’s 21 primary health centers, did not win the contract. UNRWA’s decision came after nearly two decades of partnership with the hospital.The 77th General Convention earlier this month, in passing Resolution B017, called on the Episcopal Church to support Ahli Arab Hospital through fundraising and advocacy. In Resolution B019, General Convention also affirmed positive investment “as a necessary means to create a sound economy and a sustainable infrastructure” in the Palestinian Territories.In early June, Jefferts Schori along with 101 Episcopal Church bishops wrote to President Barack Obama calling for his intervention in reversing the funding decision that, they said, could have “disastrous consequences for the more than two million residents of Gaza, already living in conditions of profound humanitarian need.”According to the UNRWA website, 1,167,572 of Gaza’s residents are registered refugees and the Gaza Strip, which is 25 miles long and between 3.7 and 7.5 miles wide, includes eight refugee camps. Of the more than 2 million total residents, fewer than 1,500 are Christian.The Ahli Arab Hospital was founded as a mission of the Anglican Church in 1882 and became a part of the diocese in 1982. Today, it is among more than 30 institutions run by the Jerusalem-based diocese throughout Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Israel and the Palestinian Territories.Suhaila Tarazi, hospital director, said in a July 26 press release, “We are proud of our long and valued relationship with UNRWA. We invite all our partners around the world to help us stay open and be ready to serve the poor in Gaza, regardless of race or religion.”The American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem recently sent $50,000 to the hospital as part of its ongoing mission to support the institutions of the diocese.Acknowledging that the humanitarian tragedy in Gaza “is well known and ongoing,” Anne Lynn, executive director of AFEDJ, told ENS that Ahli Arab Hospital “is the face of Christianity for these beleaguered people. So it’s no surprise that the Diocese of Jerusalem is committed to stay the course and keep the doors open.”Lynn said that AFEDJ and its donors are committed to help. “The diocese is taking smart, long-range steps to sustain the hospital. But they can’t make this transition without a lot of support,” she said. “We’ll be working hard find that support so the skilled staff at Ahli can continue to provide compassionate care to all.”— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA By Matthew DaviesPosted Jul 26, 2012 Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 UNRWA extends funding for six months to Gaza’s Ahli Arab Hospital An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY Tags AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI last_img read more

‘Remember the survivors’: Japanese Anglicans to Communion women

first_img‘Remember the survivors’: Japanese Anglicans to Communion women Second anniversary of triple disaster in Japan prompts appeal for prayer By ACNS staffPosted Mar 8, 2013 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Anglican Communion, Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tags The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Anglican, Episcopal women pray for the Japanese representativesPhoto: ACNS[Anglican Communion News Service] Japanese Anglicans made a heartfelt plea for prayer to their Anglican Communion sisters March 7, following an update of the post-disaster situation in their country.The Very Rev. Tazu Sasamori and her colleagues showed a delegation of Anglican women gathered in New York a video detailing the progress of Nippon Sei Ko Kai’s (NSKK) Let Us Walk Together initiative. (Nippon Sei Ko Kai is the Anglican Church in Japan. It is one of 38 member provinces of the worldwide Anglican Communion.)The video highlighted the work of the initiative’s 7,000 staff and volunteers who have been involved with everything from helping to rebuild the fishing industry in Jusanhama to teaching Japanese to immigrants in Minami Sanriku, to providing support to some of the 320,000 people still living as refugees.The video demonstrated the crucial role of NSKK in the relief and recovery phase after the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster hit Japan on March 11, 2011. But it also revealed that many thousands of people were still struggling with the emotional and economic losses caused.Sasamori, herself originally from one of the worst-hit areas, Tohoku, thanked the members of Anglican Communion for their support since the disaster. Many clergy and volunteers from across Japan and South Korea traveled to the worst-affected areas to help. The primates of the Anglican Church of Korea, the Anglican Church of Canada and the Episcopal Church were just some Anglican Communion leaders who visited. And one of the Episcopal Church’s young adult missioners was working in Sendai this past year.The dean went on to say that the nuclear fallout in particular is still causing real concern and anxiety, particularly for young families who simply do not know what the long-term impact of the nuclear fallout will be.“The effect of radiation will last for many years to come,” she said. “As you can imagine it affects small children and young women a lot. One of my high school students told me, ‘Now I must give up getting married to someone, or not give birth to a child.“Among some small children they have discovered some whose thyroid glands have gone wrong. One three-year-old asked his mother ‘Will I die soon?’ So please remember them all in your prayers. For those still living in areas [affected by radiation] not being forgotten is a gift.”Sasamori — who now works in the Diocese of Tokyo, as dean of St. Andrew’s Cathedral, rector of St. Andrew’s Church and rector in charge of St. George’s Church, Ogasawara — also asked the Anglican Communion to pray for the Tohoku diocese.“There are only seven priests for a huge diocese. While they are trying to help, support and pray for other people, they are also victims of this disaster themselves.”Following the presentation, about 30 Anglican women — who are in New York for the 57th U.N. Commission on the Status of Women — made an immediate response to the appeal by gathering around the NSKK representatives and prayed for them and their country.center_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Women’s Ministry Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Asia, Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID last_img read more