UNRWA extends funding for six months to Gaza’s Ahli Arab…

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Israel-Palestine, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Anglican Communion, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Middle East Rector Bath, NC Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori learns about the ministry of Ahli Arab Hospital from its director Suhaila Tarazi. Jefferts Schori visited Gaza and the hospital in March 2008. ENS photo/Matthew Davies[Episcopal News Service] The United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) has offered to extend funding support for the Ahli Arab Hospital in Gaza for six months, allowing the hospital to honor its financial obligations and retain its staff until the end of 2012.On June 1, UNRWA announced it would no longer fund the hospital, which provides primary and emergency health care to the almost exclusively Muslim population in Gaza. The decision cut the hospital’s budget by approximately $1 million per year, or nearly half.Bishop Suheil Dawani said in a press release that the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem, which runs the hospital, is “absolutely committed” to keeping the institution open, “as it is the only Christian hospital in the Gaza Strip, … [but] we know that we need to move quickly to help the hospital transition to a different model, so that it is not financially dependent on UNRWA from 2013 and so that donors can have confidence to continue to invest in equipment and programs.”Dawani said that the diocese has engaged a consultancy firm to assist with the development of a new strategic plan for the hospital’s future.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori welcomed the news about UNRWA’s bridging contract. While it doesn’t solve the longer-term problem of funding, she said, it does at least offer some space.“The Episcopal Church is most grateful for UNRWA’s decision to provide six months of transitional support to Al Ahli Hospital,” Jefferts Schori told ENS July 26. “This offers the Diocese of Jerusalem a slim window in which to develop funding for 2013 and beyond. It will be challenging work, but I have abundant hope that partners from around the world will rally to support this essential and transformative ministry of healing.”UNRWA, which functions as a relief agency for Palestinian refugees, earlier this year decided to run a transparent application process for its funding of in-patient services in Gaza. The Ahli Arab Hospital, one of Gaza’s 21 primary health centers, did not win the contract. UNRWA’s decision came after nearly two decades of partnership with the hospital.The 77th General Convention earlier this month, in passing Resolution B017, called on the Episcopal Church to support Ahli Arab Hospital through fundraising and advocacy. In Resolution B019, General Convention also affirmed positive investment “as a necessary means to create a sound economy and a sustainable infrastructure” in the Palestinian Territories.In early June, Jefferts Schori along with 101 Episcopal Church bishops wrote to President Barack Obama calling for his intervention in reversing the funding decision that, they said, could have “disastrous consequences for the more than two million residents of Gaza, already living in conditions of profound humanitarian need.”According to the UNRWA website, 1,167,572 of Gaza’s residents are registered refugees and the Gaza Strip, which is 25 miles long and between 3.7 and 7.5 miles wide, includes eight refugee camps. Of the more than 2 million total residents, fewer than 1,500 are Christian.The Ahli Arab Hospital was founded as a mission of the Anglican Church in 1882 and became a part of the diocese in 1982. Today, it is among more than 30 institutions run by the Jerusalem-based diocese throughout Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Israel and the Palestinian Territories.Suhaila Tarazi, hospital director, said in a July 26 press release, “We are proud of our long and valued relationship with UNRWA. We invite all our partners around the world to help us stay open and be ready to serve the poor in Gaza, regardless of race or religion.”The American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem recently sent $50,000 to the hospital as part of its ongoing mission to support the institutions of the diocese.Acknowledging that the humanitarian tragedy in Gaza “is well known and ongoing,” Anne Lynn, executive director of AFEDJ, told ENS that Ahli Arab Hospital “is the face of Christianity for these beleaguered people. So it’s no surprise that the Diocese of Jerusalem is committed to stay the course and keep the doors open.”Lynn said that AFEDJ and its donors are committed to help. “The diocese is taking smart, long-range steps to sustain the hospital. But they can’t make this transition without a lot of support,” she said. “We’ll be working hard find that support so the skilled staff at Ahli can continue to provide compassionate care to all.”— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA By Matthew DaviesPosted Jul 26, 2012 Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 UNRWA extends funding for six months to Gaza’s Ahli Arab Hospital An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY Tags AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI last_img read more

‘Remember the survivors’: Japanese Anglicans to Communion women

first_img‘Remember the survivors’: Japanese Anglicans to Communion women Second anniversary of triple disaster in Japan prompts appeal for prayer By ACNS staffPosted Mar 8, 2013 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Anglican Communion, Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tags The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Anglican, Episcopal women pray for the Japanese representativesPhoto: ACNS[Anglican Communion News Service] Japanese Anglicans made a heartfelt plea for prayer to their Anglican Communion sisters March 7, following an update of the post-disaster situation in their country.The Very Rev. Tazu Sasamori and her colleagues showed a delegation of Anglican women gathered in New York a video detailing the progress of Nippon Sei Ko Kai’s (NSKK) Let Us Walk Together initiative. (Nippon Sei Ko Kai is the Anglican Church in Japan. It is one of 38 member provinces of the worldwide Anglican Communion.)The video highlighted the work of the initiative’s 7,000 staff and volunteers who have been involved with everything from helping to rebuild the fishing industry in Jusanhama to teaching Japanese to immigrants in Minami Sanriku, to providing support to some of the 320,000 people still living as refugees.The video demonstrated the crucial role of NSKK in the relief and recovery phase after the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster hit Japan on March 11, 2011. But it also revealed that many thousands of people were still struggling with the emotional and economic losses caused.Sasamori, herself originally from one of the worst-hit areas, Tohoku, thanked the members of Anglican Communion for their support since the disaster. Many clergy and volunteers from across Japan and South Korea traveled to the worst-affected areas to help. The primates of the Anglican Church of Korea, the Anglican Church of Canada and the Episcopal Church were just some Anglican Communion leaders who visited. And one of the Episcopal Church’s young adult missioners was working in Sendai this past year.The dean went on to say that the nuclear fallout in particular is still causing real concern and anxiety, particularly for young families who simply do not know what the long-term impact of the nuclear fallout will be.“The effect of radiation will last for many years to come,” she said. “As you can imagine it affects small children and young women a lot. One of my high school students told me, ‘Now I must give up getting married to someone, or not give birth to a child.“Among some small children they have discovered some whose thyroid glands have gone wrong. One three-year-old asked his mother ‘Will I die soon?’ So please remember them all in your prayers. For those still living in areas [affected by radiation] not being forgotten is a gift.”Sasamori — who now works in the Diocese of Tokyo, as dean of St. Andrew’s Cathedral, rector of St. Andrew’s Church and rector in charge of St. George’s Church, Ogasawara — also asked the Anglican Communion to pray for the Tohoku diocese.“There are only seven priests for a huge diocese. While they are trying to help, support and pray for other people, they are also victims of this disaster themselves.”Following the presentation, about 30 Anglican women — who are in New York for the 57th U.N. Commission on the Status of Women — made an immediate response to the appeal by gathering around the NSKK representatives and prayed for them and their country.center_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Women’s Ministry Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Asia, Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID last_img read more

Serena Beeks, DuBose Egleston Jr. elected to NAES governing board

first_imgSerena Beeks, DuBose Egleston Jr. elected to NAES governing board Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI [National Association of Episcopal Schools press release] The Governing Board of the National Association of Episcopal Schools (NAES) is pleased to announce the election of Serena E. Beeks, D.Min., and D. DuBose Egleston, Jr., to the board effective July 1, 2013. Dr. Beeks, executive director of the Commission on Schools of the diocese of Los Angeles, will serve a full, three-year term. Mr. Egleston, head of school at Porter-Gaud School, Charleston, South Carolina, will serve out the remaining two years of a full term being vacated by L. Hamilton Clark, who is retiring from the Episcopal Academy in Newtown Square, Pennsylvania.“We are thrilled to welcome Dr. Beeks and Mr. Egleston to the Governing Board. Serena and DuBose are leaders of superb distinction and commitment to Episcopal schools and education,” said Doreen S. Oleson, Ed.D., head of school at Saint Mark’s Episcopal School, Altadena, California, and president of the NAES Governing Board. “I look forward to working with Serena and DuBose as we continue to expand the reach of the association’s mission and ministry,” said the Reverend Daniel R. Heischman, D.D., executive director of NAES.Serena E. Beeks, D.Min., is the executive director of the Commission on Schools of the diocese of Los Angeles. She was the founding head of school of Saint Mark’s Episcopal School, Upland, California, which opened in 1982 and of which she is head of school emerita. Since her departure from Saint Mark’s in the late 1990s, she has served as a school head, division head, and interim chaplain in Episcopal and independent schools.From 1991-1997 and 1999-2000, Dr. Beeks was a member of the NAES Governing Board, serving as its secretary from 1993 to 1997. She was also co-chair of NAES Biennial Conferences 1993 and 2000. She is a 2006 recipient of the association’s Ruth Jenkins Award for outstanding service to NAES and Episcopal schools. Currently, she volunteers and assists with partnershipsbetween Episcopal schools in the U.S. and in the diocese of Haiti.A graduate of the University of California, Dr. Beeks holds a doctor of ministry degree in educational leadership from Virginia Theological Seminary and a master of arts degree from the Claremont Graduate School.D. DuBose Egleston, Jr., is the head of school at Porter-Gaud School, Charleston, South Carolina. A 1993 graduate of the school, he joined Porter-Gaud in 2000 as director of technology. He then served as assistant head for finance and operations (2007-2009) and acting head of school (2009-2010) before being named head of school in 2010. Mr. Egleston’s ties to Porter-Gaud are multi- generational: his great-grandfather graduated from Porter Military Academy in 1897, his grandfather was chairman of the science department, and the school’s highest award for science achievement is endowed by the Egleston family.Mr. Egleston graduated from Furman University with a bachelor of arts degree in biology. He received his master of business administration degree from The Citadel. Prior to his return to Porter-Gaud, he worked for the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, and then as an academic computing specialist at Furman.The National Association of Episcopal Schools (NAES) is an independently incorporated, voluntary membership organization that supports, serves, and advocates for the vital work and ministry of those who serve nearly 1,200 Episcopal schools and early childhood education programs throughout the Episcopal Church, as well as school establishment efforts. Chartered in 1965, with historic roots dating to the 1930s, NAES is the only pre-collegiate educational association that is both national in scope and Episcopal in character. The association advances Episcopal education and strengthens Episcopal schools through essential services, resources, conferences, and networking opportunities on Episcopal school identity, leadership, and governance, and on the spiritual and professional development of school leaders. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT People center_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Posted Jul 1, 2013 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA last_img read more

Archbishop Desmond Tutu undergoes surgery

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Anglican Communion An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Archbishop Desmond Tutu undergoes surgery Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA center_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Africa, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group By Gavin DrakePosted Sep 8, 2016 [Anglican Communion News Service] Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town Desmond Tutu is recovering in hospital “in good spirits” after surgery on Sept. 7. Tutu has battled recurring infections since mid-2015 and was admitted two weeks ago for treatment to control the infection.Full article. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York last_img read more

Bishops of Companion Links Dioceses come together in Diocese of…

first_img Comments are closed. Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Anglican Communion Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA By Kate Miller Posted Aug 22, 2017 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments (1) Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET [Episcopal Diocese of Wyoming] In February of 2014 the bishops of Kiteto, Leicester, Mount Kilimanjaro, Trichy-Tanjore, and Wyoming, met in Trichy-Tanjore, South India, to discuss existing links between their  dioceses and how they may go about furthering their relationships.The Rt. Rev. Isaiah Chambala (Kiteto), the Rt. Rev. Tim Stevens (Leicester), the Rt. Rev. Stanley Hotay (Mount Kilimanjaro), the Rt. Rev. Gnanamuthu “Paul” Vasanthakumar (Trichy-Tanjore), and the Rt. Rev. John Smylie (Wyoming) studied Scripture, reflected, worshipped, and experienced life in Trichy-Tanjore through visits to churches, temples, schools, and hospitals.“All of these ingredients helped forge strong working relationships in an atmosphere of generous hospitality”The bishops issued a joint statement from the 2014 gathering, which reads in part, “All of these ingredients helped forge strong working relationships in an atmosphere of generous hospitality from the Trichy-Tanjore diocese. This landmark meeting of Bishops from four continents was found, by all participants, to be enriching, inspiring and, by turns, challenging. [It was] a time of sensing the movement of the Holy Spirit and a model in microcosm of the Anglican Communion at work across widely varied cultures and contexts.”They also developed affirmations, commitments, and resolutions detailing their hopes, plans, and steps in nurturing the Companion Links relationship. The list of these items is below.The bishops met again in April and May of 2015 in Jerusalem, their focus being the continued development of their relationships and the connections between their dioceses. Their coming together also functions to model the idea of embracing “difference without division” within the Anglican Communion.The joint statement issued from the 2015 meeting expresses the bishops’ pledge to work together and disallow differences to inhibit their common goal to spread faith through ministry.In May of 2016 the bishops came together for a third time in Leicester, England, for the installation and seating of the Rt. Rev. Martyn Snow, who succeeded the Rt. Rev. Tim Stevens, as the bishop of Leicester.This year, the Diocese of Wyoming will host all the bishops of the Companion Links Dioceses at the end of August and into September. They will reunite in Casper, Wyoming, and travel together to Cody, Wyoming. Bishop Hotay will give a presentation at the Diocese of Wyoming’s annual clergy spouse conference regarding the strong growth experienced within the Diocese of Mount Kilimanjaro.While in Cody, the group will stay at Thomas the Apostle Center, a diocesan retreat facility. The Rev. Dr. Suresh Kumar of the Diocese of Trichy-Tanjore and the Very. Rev. Lori Modesitt of the Diocese of Wyoming will be facilitators for the group.The group will attend a local rodeo and visit Yellowstone National Park, but the primary objective for their gathering includes discussion of a formal covenant between the Companion Links Dioceses. The hope is to further clarify the connection and build a better understanding of the Companion Links relationship so the relationship is not entirely dependent on the Bishops, but carried on by other members of the dioceses. If possible, the hope is for the group to come to a determination on the covenant, which can be presented and voted upon during the Diocese of Wyoming’s annual convention in October.The Rev. Roxanne Jimerson-Friday, the first Native American woman from the Wind River Indian Reservation in Wyoming to be ordained to the priesthood of the Episcopal Church, will speak to the group about Native American experiences in the church. The Rev. Warren Murphy, author of On Sacred Ground: A Religious and Spiritual History of Wyoming, will speak about environmental stewardship, which is a concern for all of the dioceses, especially Tanzania, where they are experiencing severe draught.Each visiting bishop will attend a service at a local parish and participate as a member of the congregation; they won’t be preaching or presiding, but experiencing the services, the people, and church life specific to that church as if they are a member.The visiting bishops will be introduced to Mutual Ministry, a unique model that is not seen in many other parts of the world beyond North America. It is a model that focuses on the inclusion of entire congregations to support, promote, and advance ministry.Wyoming was one of the first dioceses to use the contemporary version of Mutual Ministry, as its recognition that all baptized individuals are responsible for ministry has helped small, rural congregations grow their ministry and leadership. The Rt. Rev. Bob Jones (bishop of Wyoming, 1977-1996) started thinking about adopting the model and the Rt. Rev. Bruce Caldwell (bishop of Wyoming, 1997-2010) made that vision a priority for the diocese. Bishop Smylie, has worked to strengthen the diocese using the model with the formation of clergy and laity.Visit www.wyomingdiocese.org or follow the Episcopal Diocese of Wyoming in Facebook to keep apprised of Companion Links happenings.Companion Links Relationships Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ann K Fontaine says: Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI center_img Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ August 23, 2017 at 7:23 pm I think you mean drought? not draught (draught–British spelling of draft (sense 3 of the noun, sense 4 of the noun, sense 6 of the noun, sense 7 of the noun). Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishops of Companion Links Dioceses come together in Diocese of Wyoming A commitment to developing partnership in the gospel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Affirmations:1. Joy in the partnerships already shared between dioceses, a continuing honoring of agreements already in place and commitment to more fully realizing the promise these global links hold for future mission and ministry2. The contribution of each other to God’s mission in the world3. The continuing need to listen, learn and be enriched by each other through a deepening process of engagement4. At diocesan, church community and individual levels affirming the significance of mutual support, encouragement and challenge in nurturing relationships across cultures as an expression of our communion in the Body of Christ and our openness to the movement of the Holy Spirit.5. The developing of processes at diocesan and local level to enhance local mission (e.g. in growth of the church, depth of discipleship and engagement with the wider community) through our interactions and mutual resourcing.Commitments:1. A spiritual and theological pilgrimage together of intensifying relationships, modeling a microcosm of the Anglican communion through mutual trust, sharing and cooperation in furthering God’s mission.2. Continually asking how we partner together in ways which keep Jesus Christ as our focus and center, exploring how we understand Jesus Christ and our following of Christ in our different cultures.3. Exploring in our own lives and that of our dioceses through these relationships how to develop greater transparency, honesty, mutual accountability, self-critique and openness to transformation.4. Strengthening bi-lateral and other linkages between the five dioceses as the Holy Spirit leads, taking seriously the work of prayerful discernment and missional experimentation.5. Extending the present partnering more widely to leaders and Christian communities within our dioceses.6. Take seriously one another’s challenges (e.g. corruption, clergy training, growth, poverty, wealth etc.) and collaborate practically, prophetically and persistently on addressing such challenges.7. Take seriously the differences in modes of communication between our cultures and endeavor to be mutually understanding, flexible and responsive in communicating.Resolutions:1. Meet between April 27th and May 4th 2015 in Jerusalem in a spirit of pilgrimage to continue conversations on the affirmations and commitments above, exploring doing so with at least one other senior leader from each of our dioceses as we seek to widen the circle of conversation and participation in partnership.2. Be in quarterly contact (May, July, Oct & Jan) with one another as bishops between face-to-face meetings through coordinated communications (via Rev. Dr. Suresh Kumar and Canon Mike Harrison) and so forge a sense of on-going relationship and journeying together.3. Share this statement with the relevant church bodies of our dioceses, inviting consideration of the affirmations and commitments outlined above with a view to deeper relationships in Christ between one another’s dioceses.— Kate Miller is the Diocese of Wyoming’s  director of communication. Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MIlast_img read more

Follow social media updates from Austin at 79th General Convention

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Social media updates from General Convention 2018 in Austin, Texas The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Posted Jul 3, 2018 General Convention 2018, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK [Episcopal News Service] Episcopalians and Episcopal leaders from across the U.S. are gathered in Austin, Texas, for the 79th General Convention, which runs through July 13.You can follow social media updates from General Convention by following and posting with the hashtag #GC79, and we will be maintaining a feed that pulls in Tweets and Instagram photos below.No Posts!Load More Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 General Convention, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Social Media Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest last_img read more

Priests emphasize peace and justice after Seattle-area Episcopal churches vandalized…

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Priests emphasize peace and justice after Seattle-area Episcopal churches vandalized on MLK Day Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service By David PaulsenPosted Jan 27, 2020 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY [Episcopal News Service] Clergy members in the Diocese of Olympia, in the wake of an outbreak of vandalism at their churches over the Martin Luther King Jr. Day weekend, have responded with messages of love that invoke King’s own words advocating peace and justice in the face of hatred.The vandalism at St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral in Seattle, Washington, defaced a white outer wall of the church. Photo: St. Mark’sThe diocese had no information that any other churches were targeted or that the attacks were connected, Josh Hornbeck, the diocese’s communications director, told ENS.Hate-filled graffiti that singled out the LGBTQ community and Muslims was found on a door at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Seattle, Washington, over the holiday weekend, according to the diocese, which didn’t give an exact date. The Rev. Britt Olson, vicar at St. Luke’s, said in a statement released by the diocese that the graffiti was discovered quickly, before most arriving worshippers could notice it.The church also has received threatening letters, emails and phone calls, “for its mission of caring for those on the margins,” Olson said. The attacks have been “deeply disturbing” and “it is infinitely worse to know that this hatred is the daily experience for many in our community.”At St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral in Seattle, black paint was sprayed on a white wall forming a message in bold letters that included the phrases “Marxist Idiots” and “Wake Up!” The Very Rev. Steven Thomason, dean of the cathedral, wrote that he assumed the message was intended to provoke anger, but he felt a greater sadness upon first seeing it.“I find myself prayerful – for those whose lives are filled with such hatred that they can justify desecrating a church, for this community that we might bring the fullness of our hearts and souls into this call to be the Body of Christ … and for this nation whose political discourse seems to condone acts such as this vandalism as justifiable in the course of partisan disagreements,” Thomason said in a written statement.In Everett, north of Seattle, vandals spray-painted inverted crosses on the main doors at Trinity Episcopal Church on the evening of the King holiday, Jan. 20. To remove the graffiti, the doors must be sanded and re-stained, the Rev. Rachel Taber-Hamilton said. She noted that King preached “that love on the level of society looks like justice.”Thomason, in his statement, quoted King’s reassurance that “the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.”St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral in Seattle, Washington, put a large banner across its wall until the recent graffiti could be painted over. Photo: St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral“We have work to do my friends, in the cause of justice,” Thomason said. “Let us do so in God’s name, with courage and faithfulness.”The cathedral’s plan to immediately paint over the graffiti has been delayed by cool, damp weather in the region, cathedral communications director Gregory Block told ENS by email. “Our solution was to conceal the message by re-purposing a banner that was last used in 2014 for a visit by author Karen Armstrong,” he said.The giant banner contains just two words: “Love Wins.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC last_img read more

Commission urges removal of Sewanee theologian from calendar of saints…

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY General Convention, [Episcopal News Service] Every year on Aug. 18, Episcopalians are invited to pray a collect that honors theologian William Porcher DuBose for his God-given “gifts of grace to understand the Scriptures and to teach the truth as it is in Christ Jesus.”A century after DuBose’s death in 1918, this seminary professor and dean is regarded as an Episcopal saint whose feast day is one of more than 150 such “lesser feasts” on the church’s official calendar. The short biography for DuBose in the church’s published volume of “Lesser Feasts and Fasts” describes him as “among the most original and creative thinkers The Episcopal Church has ever produced.” The entry on DuBose also briefly mentions his service in the Confederate Army during the Civil War.William Porcher DuBose was a professor and dean at the University of the South’s School of Theology in Sewanee, Tennessee. Photo courtesy of the William R. Laurie University Archives and Special Collections at the University of the SouthIn the past year, however, researchers have highlighted other aspects of DuBose’s life that cast doubt on his fitness for a feast day. His family once owned hundreds of slaves, and long after slavery was abolished, DuBose offered unapologetic defenses of that system of racial oppression while espousing white supremacy in some of his writings, even praising the early Ku Klux Klan.Those writings now form the backbone of a recommendation by the church’s Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music, or SCLM, to remove DuBose’s feast day from the church calendar – a rare and likely unprecedented repudiation of a church-anointed saint. “As the church continues to strive against white supremacy and the sin of racism, we must not raise as examples of heroic service those who in their lives actively worked to devalue whole classes of human persons,” the SCLM said in its Blue Book report to General Convention, which meets next in July 2022.The push to revoke DuBose’s feast day comes amid parallel moves by the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee, where DuBose was appointed the second dean of the School of Theology in 1894. The seminary, after researching DuBose’s published and unpublished writings, announced this month that it was removing his name from its annual lecture series.DuBose’s past statements on slavery and race “were incompatible with the kind of example and image that we wanted to hold up to be imitated,” the Very Rev. James Turrell, Sewanee’s seminary dean, told Episcopal News Service. Turrell, who also serves on the SCLM, sees DuBose’s feast day as similarly undeserved.“Who we choose to memorialize in our calendar is a reflection both on the people that we are remembering but also a reflection on those doing the remembering,” Turrell said. “I think one of the things that we have been coming to grips with, both in the wider church but also here at Sewanee, is the unspoken assumptions that we once made that came out of a frankly structurally racist past.”SCLM members told ENS their recommendation is based in the criteria approved by General Convention for adding and deleting feast days. The calendar “commemorates those who were, in their lifetime, extraordinary, even heroic servants of God and God’s people for the sake, and after the example, of Jesus Christ,” according to one of the criteria.DuBose may have passed that test in past church leaders’ eyes, but the SCLM in its recommendation for removal concluded his white supremacist writings now disqualify him, especially in light of the widespread secular protests in the past year against racial injustice and the racism inherent in American institutions.“DuBose was a sort of self-avowed white supremacist,” the Rev. Paul Fromberg, chair of the SCLM, told ENS. “He was not repentant of white supremacy, and in fact, he wrote in his secular writings in support of white supremacy.” None of the people on the church calendar were perfect human beings, Fromberg said, but “when it becomes clear that people on the calendar become a scandal to the church, they have to be removed.”That a long-dead Episcopal theologian has become a church scandal in 2021 further points to the ways The Episcopal Church is placing racial reconciliation work at the center of its contemporary mission and ministry in the world.“I think we as a denomination are paying a lot more attention to reparation and reconciliation,” the Rev. Scott Slater told ENS. Slater is canon to the ordinary in the Diocese of Maryland, where he has helped draft resolutions committing the diocese to racial reparations.The diocese also is preparing to host the 80th General Convention next year in Baltimore. In July 2020, Slater wrote to Fromberg requesting that he and the chair of a church committee on racism consider drafting a General Convention resolution “addressing whitewashed histories in commemorations.” He raised specific concerns that the biographical information in “Lesser Feasts and Fasts” overlooks DuBose’s white supremacist views.At the time, Slater was researching DuBose’s life and writings in preparation for a sermon he was scheduled to preach on DuBose’s feast day. A version of that sermon was posted to Episcopal Café last year on Aug. 18.“Perhaps he was a brilliant theologian, but not enough to prevent him from racism,” Slater wrote. Even in DuBose’s later years, “his attitude of white supremacy continued within the security of his privilege.”Slater’s article drew partly on the research of the Roberson Project on Slavery, Race, and Reconciliation, which Sewanee launched in 2017 to examine the Episcopal university’s origins in Southern slaveholding society and its history of complicity in other racist systems. The Rev. Benjamin King, a professor of Christian history in Sewanee’s School of Theology, specifically scrutinized DuBose’s life. When the School of Theology announced on April 13 that DuBose’s name would be removed from the school’s annual lecture series, King defended that decision.“Theology always arises in a context,” King said in a press release announcing the decision. “Even if DuBose’s theology retains an international reputation, his writings on this region and on race bear witness to his context. DuBose is not the name that best represents our context and what the School of Theology and our alumni have to offer the 21st-century church.”DuBose was born in 1836 in South Carolina into a wealthy family. By 1860, the family’s slaveholdings totaled 204 Black men, women and children, according to Sewanee’s research. “Lesser Feasts and Fasts” says DuBose was ordained a priest in 1861 and served the Confederacy as both an officer and a chaplain.The University of the South was founded in 1857 but didn’t begin enrolling students until after the Civil War, in 1868. DuBose began teaching at Sewanee in 1871 and was appointed dean of the School of Theology two decades later. He went on to publish seven books, including the autobiographical “Turning Points in My Life” in 1912. The books, which first brought him international acclaim, “treated life and doctrine as a dramatic dialogue, fusing the best of contemporary thought and criticism with his own strong inner faith,” according to his “Lesser Feasts” biography. “The result was both a personal and scriptural catholic theology.”Though mostly mining theological ideas, he also once wrote that slavery in the South was “no sin to those who engaged in it.”“The South received and exercised slavery in good faith and without doubt or question, and, whatever we pronounce it now, it was not a sin at that time to those people,” DuBose wrote in a Sewanee Review article commemorating the 1902 death of Confederate Gen. Wade Hampton. “Liable to many abuses and evils, it could also be the nurse of many great and beautiful virtues.”DuBose acknowledged that abolishing slavery was “a necessary step in the moral progress of the world,” but slavery had been “a sin of which we could not possibly be guilty.” He also suggested in the same article that Black former slaves were inferior and that downtrodden white Southerners would “come to the top” of society, like oil rising above water.The SCLM, in its proposal to remove DuBose from the church calendar, alludes to other examples of DuBose’s espousing white supremacy as late as 1914, and it cites a passage in his unpublished memoirs praising the formation of the KKK during Reconstruction: “It was an inspiration of genius – the most discreet and successful management of the situation that could have been devised.”DuBose, the SCLM concluded, “remained unrepentant for the South’s slaveholding past” and “clung to the ideology of the slaveholding Confederacy.”It isn’t clear precisely when DuBose was granted Episcopal sainthood. Turrell, the Sewanee seminary dean, found a liturgical reference to DuBose’s feast day as far back as 1971. The feast day was absent in a 1963 publication. The calendar’s criteria for additions call for a waiting period of 50 years after a prospective saint’s death, though that requirement sometimes is waived to consider more recent candidates. DuBose would have first qualified for a feast day in 1968.The Episcopal Church’s Constitution states the process for removing an individual from the calendar is the same as the process for adding someone: approval by two consecutive General Conventions. That means if General Convention votes next year to delete DuBose’s feast day, he would remain on the calendar at least until 2024, when General Convention could vote a second time for the removal. ENS searched General Convention resolutions and could find no prior example of a saint being removed from “Lesser Feasts” since it was first approved as part of the major revision of the Book of Common Prayer in 1979, nor were several current and former SCLM members able to cite such a removal.The facts about DuBose’s life may not have changed since he was added to the calendar, but the church has changed, said Fromberg, the SCLM chair.“The church is not static. The Episcopal Church is continuing to evolve,” he said. “We are learning every day how to walk the way of love. We are learning how to appreciate the saints of the church, and so with greater learning comes greater responsibility.”Such commemorations are called “lesser feasts” to differentiate them from Sunday worship and the calendar’s major holy days. Christmas and Easter, for example, are among the church’s seven principal feasts. Other major feasts mark moments in Jesus’ life, such as the Annunciation and the Transfiguration. Each apostle’s feast day is a major feast on the calendar, as are the secular holidays of Independence Day and Thanksgiving.Most days of the year, though not all, have a major or lesser feast assigned to them. Sundays and major feasts take precedence in the lectionary. On other days, worship leaders may, but aren’t required to, celebrate the lesser feasts. The lectionary offers propers – designated biblical lessons, psalms and collects – to honor the saint whose life is commemorated by the feast day, typically on the person’s date of death. The saints range from influential 13th-century Italian theologian Thomas Aquinas to Harriet Bedell, a 20th-century American deaconess and missionary.The last full revision of “Lesser Feasts and Fasts” was approved in 2006. In 2018, the SCLM proposed a new, expanded edition of “Lesser Feasts” in response to calls for a calendar that “better reflects the diversity of the church.” The existing calendar of feasts honors far more white men, especially bishops and priests, than women, people of color or lay leaders.The proposed calendar would have drawn from the additional biographical entries contained in a supplemental church text called “A Great Cloud of Witnesses,” and it would have broken the new list of lesser feasts into two tiers. DuBose would have been among the Episcopal saints relegated to the second tier, labeled “supplemental/local commemorations.”Although the 79th General Convention approved adding Thurgood Marshall, Pauli Murray and Florence Li Tim-Oi to the calendar, it shelved the SCLM’s broader proposal. Instead, it voted to maintain the existing list of lesser feasts while allowing some additional feasts for trial use and giving the SCLM more time to plan for the single, expanded calendar that it now is proposing to the 80th General Convention. “A Great Cloud of Witnesses” was made available to congregations, but General Convention stopped short of putting any canonical authority behind commemorations of those individuals.For now, DuBose remains the only name on the calendar for Aug. 18, but at least two others have been considered for that date. “A Great Cloud of Witnesses” also honors Artemisia Bowden, a Black woman from North Carolina who was chosen in 1902 to lead an Episcopal vocational school for Black children in San Antonio, Texas. The school grew to become today’s St. Philip’s College, a historically Black community college.Another potential candidate for Aug. 18 is Rosa Judith Cisneros, a Salvadoran lawyer and human rights activist who was kidnapped and killed on that day in 1981. She is remembered as an Anglican lay leader who provided legal and other assistance to El Salvador’s rural poor. Cisneros was proposed for “A Great Cloud of Witnesses” in 2015 and “Lesser Feasts” in 2018 but has yet to be approved for either calendar.In 2019, Kathleen Moore was preparing for her ordination as a deacon in the Diocese of Vermont when then-Bishop Thomas Ely emailed her and let her know that, because it was scheduled for Aug. 18, the name of the man honored on that feast day would be printed on her ordination certificate: William Porcher DuBose.“I did a quick Google search, and I was really concerned and really not comfortable with it,” Moore, now a priest in the Diocese of Northwestern Pennsylvania, recalled in an interview with ENS. “That was not a model of a lived vocation in the church that I wanted on this certificate forevermore.”The Rev. Kathleen Moore, center, is joined on Aug. 18, 2019, in Vermont for her diaconate ordination by, from left, the Rev. Scott Neal, Bishop-elect Shannon MacVean-Brown, Vermont Bishop Thomas Ely and the Rev. Lee Crawford. Photo: Diocese of VermontMoore said she asked Ely and he agreed to allow Cisneros’ name on her certificate instead of DuBose’s. “I loved that she was a lay leader, she was an activist, she was concerned with the rural poor,” Moore said. “A lot of things felt really right about it, and I got reading a bit more about her and found her to be an inspiring Christian.”Moore serves as a supply priest while working full time as communications manager for Canticle Communications. She said she supports the effort to remove DuBose from the calendar but not because she thinks DuBose is beyond redemption.“This is not saying that we don’t think God has DuBose,” she said. “But it doesn’t mean that we need to put him forward as a model of Christian living, which is really what the calendar is all about.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Racial Justice & Reconciliation, By David PaulsenPosted May 3, 2021 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Theological Education Rector Shreveport, LA Press Release Service Featured Events Commission urges removal of Sewanee theologian from calendar of saints over white supremacist writings Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Liturgy & Music, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ last_img read more

Pastors take on South Apopka violence

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter March 24, 2016 at 3:16 pm Please enter your name here The Anatomy of Fear Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate TAGSJohn Bridges Community Centersouth apopkaSouth Apopka Ministerial AllianceViolence Previous articleThe OCSO is asking for your helpNext articleWhy Early Voting Can Not Happen Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Young Kim had suggested at the AHS debate that one of the things he thought needed to be done was somehow to make the bike trail more safe for people. He had talked about how people were even afraid to use parts of the bike trail. We now have an 18 year old high school student dead, shot to death, and it happened right near the bike trail in south Apopka, although he wasn’t biking, I don’t believe. There needs to be some serious extra efforts put forth from both Mayor Kilsheimer and Orange County Commissioner Bryon Nelson both, and work together regardless of politics, because this is beyond serious, what is happening to our youth being gunned down. It is happening in the incorporated and unincorporated areas. Crime is here, it is everywhere, all over the nation. We all want nice attractive streetscapes, businesses, but the escalating crime resulting in our citizens being gunned downed and murdered, must be made the most important priority, otherwise all other efforts will be in vain. We need to do whatever it takes, to try keep the people safe. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here 1 COMMENT We ask these questions:What are the existing services within our community that we can utilize i.e., mentoring, educational, conflict resolution etc.?Where are services located?What services are needed?The bottom line is accountability and responsibility. We don’t have the answers independent of one another. We need you to come to the table and HELP, bring your ideas, your innovations but most importantly be present and accounted for. Mothers, come and tell us how we can help, Fathers, show that we are present, as a community we can stand up to what ails our community together. Please tell your neighbors, your family members, your friends, come out and let’s do more than talk, let’s turn words into ACTION!!!If anyone has any substantive strategies or suggestions, prior to this community meeting, we welcome your input.”center_img It has been an unusually violent Spring Break in Apopka and South Apopka. On Saturday, and again on Monday a teenager was shot and killed. And while it is unusual for two teenagers to be murdered within 48 hours of one another, it only highlights the violence that this section of the city has experienced for generations.But on Thursday evening, The South Apopka Ministerial Alliance (SAMA) will take the first steps in finding solutions to this horrific issue. They will bring together local community leaders, pastors, Apopka Police and Orange County Sheriffs, and the public to talk.Pastors Hezekiah Bradford (The President of the SAMA) and Richard King will host a meeting at The John Bridges Community Center (445 13th Street Apopka) this Thursday, March 24th at 6:00pm to address the issues of the community.In his email, Bradford writes:“I would like to extend an invitation to all concerned with the senseless violence and death within our Apopka community.We realize that one community meeting will not solve what ails our community, but we MUST start somewhere and the purpose of this community meeting is to address our role and responsibility within our community. Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment! The South Apopka Ministerial Alliance would like to invite you to the John Bridges Community Center  at 445 13th Street in  Apopka this Thursday at 6:00pm to address the issues of our community. Tenita Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

On This Day: Rhett Butler uses the “D” Word

first_img Please enter your name here On This Day In History: June 27th, 1939From The History ChannelOn this day in 1939, one of the most famous scenes in movie history is filmed–Rhett Butler and Scarlett O’Hara parting in Gone with the Wind. Director Victor Fleming also shot the scene using the alternate line, “Frankly, my dear, I just don’t care,” in case the film censors objected to the word “damn.” The censors approved the movie but fined producer David O. Selznick $5,000 for including the curse.The filming of the famous epic was itself an epic, with two and half years elapsing between Selznick’s purchase of the rights to Margaret Mitchell’s novel and the movie’s debut in Atlanta in December 1939. Selznick had balked at paying an unprecedented $50,000 for the rights to a first novel, but Mitchell stuck to her asking price and Selznick agreed in July 1937. He hired director George Cukor immediately, and casting began in the fall. Selznick launched a nationwide talent search, hoping to find a new actress to play Scarlett. Meanwhile, he set writers to work on the script.A year later, Selznick still hadn’t found an actress or received a satisfactory script. In May 1938, running low on funds, Selznick struck a deal with MGM. He sold the worldwide distribution rights for the film to the studio for $1.5 million, and MGM agreed to lend Clark Gable to Selznick.Filming finally began on December 10, 1938, with the burning of Atlanta scene, although Scarlett still hadn’t been cast. British actress Vivien Leigh, newly arrived from London, dropped by the set to visit her agent, Myron Selznick, brother of the producer. David O. Selznick asked her to test for Scarlett. In January, Leigh signed on as Scarlett and Leslie Howard as Ashley Wilkes, and at last, principal filming began. By February, however, there was trouble on the set. Gable clashed with the director, and by February 14, Victor Fleming replaced George Cukor. Principal filming ended on June 27, 1939.The film debuted in Atlanta on December 15, 1939, and became an instant hit, breaking all box office records. The film was nominated for more than a dozen Oscars, and won nine, including Best Picture, Best Screenplay, Best Actress, and Best Supporting Actress (which went to Hattie McDaniel, the first African American actress to win the award). The movie was digitally restored and the sound re-mastered for its 1998 re-release by New Line Pictures.For more information on This Day in History, go here. TAGSGone With The WindHistory Channelhistory.comThis day in history Previous articleGet moving! 6 ways to add steps to your dayNext articleBreaking News: Two injured in drive-by shooting Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Please enter your comment! Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 The Anatomy of Fear last_img read more